Section 3:  COMPREHENSIVE STANDARDS

Institutional Mission, Governance,

And Effectiveness

 

3.1.1    The mission statement is current and comprehensive, accurately guides the institution’s operations, is periodically reviewed and updated, is approved by the governing board, and is communicated to the institution’s constituencies. (Mission)

 

_X__ Compliance           ___ Partial Compliance          ___ Non-Compliance

 

The Mission Statement of Coastal Bend College was reviewed and discussed at the January 17, 2013, Board Meeting and was determined to be consistent with Policy AD (LOCAL). The mission statement is reviewed annually as documented by the January 19, 2012 (p.2, Item 6B) and February 17, 2011 (p.2, Item 6A) Board minutes.

 

The mission statement is comprehensive which clearly communicates the College’s characteristics as a public community College and guides the College’s directions, decisions, activities, policies and procedures.  The College has an open enrollment and serves a very diverse population in South Texas with the main focus being on student learning.  The Vision 2020 Strategic Plan and the nine (9) purpose statements demonstrate the commitment to providing quality education and a learning environment conducive of student success.  This is supported by the academic, workforce, continuing education, dual credit, and tutoring programs, and is further enhanced by the College’s distance learning capabilities.  The College provides courses for students to earn associates degrees, certificates, and follows a core curriculum for the successful transfer of courses to a post-secondary institution.  The College maintains and/or establishes programs to provide career opportunities to meet local and statewide needs. This is supported by the qualified full-time and part-time faculty who are dedicated to student success.  Each faculty member’s qualifications are listed in the Faculty Qualification Matrix.  All students have access to Student Resources which encompasses many areas other than counseling.  This includes access to The Student Success Center to increase individual student success rates.  Developmental courses are in place in English, Reading, and Math for any student who fails to meet the assessment standards to ensure College readiness.

 

Coastal Bend College communicates its mission statement in a consistent manner to all constituents.  The mission statement is included in the College Catalog and on the College Website which is authorized by AD (LEGAL). 

 

3.2.1    The governing board of the institution is responsible for the selection and the periodic evaluation of the chief executive officer. (CEO evaluation/selection) ___  Compliance__X         Partial Compliance      ___       Non-Compliance

Narrative:   Coastal Bend College’s Chief Executive Officer is Dr. Beatriz Espinoza, President. She was selected on March 22, 2012 by the Coastal Bend College Board of Trustees and started work during the first week of June 2012.

Responsibility of Selection of CEO

Section BAA-(LEGAL) # 15 (pg. 2) of the Board policy manual states the Board shall: "Appoint and evaluate the College President, and assist the College President in the achievement of performance goals"  and the Texas Education Code 51.352(d)(e), which stipulates that governing boards appoint the presidents and other chief executive officers of institutions under their control.

The selection and appointment process at the College includes national advertisement, inclusion of the College and service area community members though open forums to discuss the required and desired qualities of the College president as well as direct email access to our search consultants, and on-campus interviews and open forums for all finalists. Selection and appointment of the new president, however, is solely the responsibility of the Board and is based on the Board’s estimation of the candidates’ abilities to fulfill the duties and responsibilities of the president, which is described in BFA (LOCAL).

 The search that resulted in the hiring of the current president, Dr. Beatriz Espinoza, in March 2012, provides a good example of this process. The process began in November of 2011. The Board initiated a search for a new president by hiring the consulting group Association of Community College Trustees and the staff and public were kept informed of each step of the process and results by means of Progress Reports (1, 2, 3, 4, 5) published on the College webpage by Mr. Paul Jaure, Coastal Bend College Board of Trustees Chairman.

By looking at this excerpt from progress report #1 by Mr. Jaure on November 8, 2011 College personnel, students and community members participated in the search from the beginning:

“The Board of Trustees has engaged the services of the Association of Community College Trustees to assist the Board in conducting a national search for a new president of our College. ACCT has a long and successful history of successful presidential searches and their assistance and resources will be of great value to Coastal Bend College as we embark on this journey.

Members of the College community and service area communities are invited to participate in a free and wide-ranging discussion about the qualities and qualifications we are seeking in our new president were invited to attend specified forums or email ACCT to participate in the development of this Presidential Profile.

The position was advertised locally as well as in national publications such as The Chronicle of Higher Education. The Board announced five finalists at its March 2, 2012 Progress Report #5  and open forums were held with each of the finalists so that faculty staff, students, and members of the community could meet each candidate. The Board made the decision to select Dr. Espinoza during a closed session of the March 22, 2012 meeting (pg. 2, Item 9D), and made the announcement to meeting attendees when open session resumed.

Periodic Evaluation

Section BFD (LOCAL) of the policy manual states: "The Board shall prepare a written evaluation of the College President at annual or more frequent intervals and may at any time conduct and communicate oral evaluations to augment its written evaluations. The written evaluation shall be based on the College President's job description and other criteria identified by the Board."  The last president to be evaluated was Dr. Thom Baynum, and the Board signed the evaluation on August 31, 2010. The president’s evaluation for 2010-2011 was on the Board agenda for both August 2011 (pg. 8, Item 9D) and September 2011 (pg. 6, Item 10D), but Dr. Baynum submitted his resignation and the Board accepted during the October 2011 (pg. 5, Item 10C) meeting.  Dr. Jimmy Goodson was Interim President from January 2012 until Dr. Espinoza was appointed in June 2012.

The President's full range of duties and responsibilities are outlined in the section BFA(LOCAL) of the policy manual. Evaluation of the President is outlined in section BFD (LOCAL) of the policy manual.  Texas Education Code 51.352(d) (3) requires that the governing board evaluate the chief executive officer of the institution and assist the officer in the achievement of performance goals. Further, the BAA-(LEGAL) # 15 (pg. 2) stipulates that the Board must periodically evaluate the president’s performance.

The Board stipulated in Dr. Espinoza’s contract that she will be evaluated annually as they had for every previous President.  The Board attended a retreat to address the future goals and evaluations of Dr. Espinoza during a retreat on August 11, 2012 (Board Minutes – August 11, 2012, pg. 1, Item 3A).

 

3.2.2    The legal authority and operating control of the institution are clearly defined for the following areas within the institution’s governance structure: (Governing board control)

 

3.2.2.1 The institution’s mission

_X__  Compliance           ___  Partial Compliance          ___  Non-Compliance

Narrative:   These sections of policy require the Board to establish and periodically review the mission of the College and establish goals consistent with the role and mission of the College. In fulfillment of its responsibilities the Board reviewed and approved the Mission, Values, Goals and Objectives on November 12, 2005 at a Board Retreat. It’s most recent annual review of the Role and Mission of the College was January 17, 2013 (Board Agenda). The Board reaffirmed the Mission and Purpose Statement on that date. Board Minutes of January 19, 2012 summarize the Board’s review and discussion of the College Mission, Vision and Values, and is available below:

(Page 2, Item 6B)

The Board reviewed and discussed the College’s Educational Role and Mission, Purpose, Responsibility, Vision, Core Values, Statement of Ethics and Integrity as outlined in Policy AD (LOCAL). The Board was informed that the College’s current Mission and Vision as outlined in Policy AD (LOCAL) and in the CBC 2020 Strategic Plan were consistent.

Mrs. Fischer moved and Mr. Lohse seconded to approve the College’s Educational Role, Mission, Purpose, Responsibility, Vision, Core Values, Statement of Ethics and Integrity as outlined in AD (LOCAL) and as reviewed and discussed.

 

The Texas Education Code 51.352 defines the legal authority and operating control of the institution as it pertains to the institution's mission, and is covered in policy BAA (LEGAL). The College’s governing board is invested with the responsibility to:

·         preserve institutional independence;

·         defend its right to manage its own affairs through its chosen administrators and employees;

·         enhance the public image of the College;

·         interpret the community to the campus and interpret the campus to the community;

·         nurture the institution in achieving its role, mission and goals;

·         insist on clarity of focus of the mission;

·         appoint, evaluate, and assist the president in the achievement of performance goals; and

·         set campus admission standards consistent with the role and mission of the institution.

The Board of Trustees periodically reviews the College’s mission as documented by board minutes:

·         January 19, 2012, Pg. 2, Item 6B

·         February 17, 2011, Pg. 2, Item 6A

·         June 24, 2010, Pg. 3, Item 6D

3.2.2.2 The fiscal stability of the institution

__X_  Compliance           ___  Partial Compliance          ___  Non-Compliance

 

Narrative:   Texas Education Code 51.352 assigns to the Board the legal authority and operating control for fiscal stability. This law states that each member of the governing board has the legal responsibilities of a fiduciary in the management of funds for the institution. Coastal Bend College has seven at-large elected members from Bee County that serve as the Board of Trustees.

The full range of responsibilities, powers, and duties are spelled out in section BAA-(LEGAL) of the policy manual.  Among others, it states the board is an active policy-making body for the institution and is ultimately responsible for ensuring that the financial resources of the institution are adequate to provide a sound educational program. The board is not controlled by a minority of board members or by organizations or interests separate from it. Neither the presiding officer of the board nor the majority of other voting members of the board have contractual, employment, personal or familial financial interest in the institution.

 

Section BBE (LEGAL) of the policy manual covers the fiscal responsibility of the board Further, fiscal reports are reviewed by the board at each regularly scheduled meeting and an annual audit report is presented to the board. The most recent approval was made during the December 13, 2012 Board Meeting (p.2, Item 5A) after a presentation of the audit report for the fiscal year ending August 31, 2012, by Mr. Frank Lovvorn of Lovvorn and Kieschnick, LLP.

“A comprehensive audit report of all funds and accounts of the District including a management letter shall be submitted annually to the Board. A copy of the independent audit shall become a part of the Board’s official minutes and be available to the public for inspection during regular office hours” Board Policy CDC (LOCAL)

3.2.2.3 Institutional policy

__X_  Compliance           ___  Partial Compliance          ___  Non-Compliance

 

Narrative: The policy manual clearly defines the legal authority and operating responsibility within the College District.  The Board of Trustees is the governing body of the College District and adopts rules, regulations, and bylaws as it deems necessary, which is stated in BE (LEGAL) and expanded upon in BE (LOCAL).  Policies are in place to govern and oversee the management of this institution.  The Board has the final authority to determine and interpret the policies that govern the College District within the limits imposed by the other legal authorities as stated in BBE (LOCAL).  However, Board members are not allowed to exercise authority over the College District acting as individuals unless it is for appropriated duties/functions which are sometimes necessary for the College President or individual Board members acting on behalf of the Board with the express authorization of the Board.  BAA (LEGAL) gives the Board of Trustees the authority to govern and manage the College District by local policy if not mandated by the Coordinating Board or the Central Education Agency.  Responsibilities include but are not limited to, adopt tax rates (Board Minutes, September, 2012, pg. 2, Item 6A), levy and collect taxes, exercise the right of eminent domain to acquire property, appoint the College President, (Board Minutes, March 2012, pg. 2, Item 9D) evaluate the College President, revise and adopt local policy, execute contracts, set campus admission standards, etc. 

Policy updates are provided to the College President by the Texas Association of School boards (TASB) which ensure the College District remains current and up-to-date with legal and local policies.  The President’s Leadership Team comprised of the College President, administrators, and staff is responsible for reviewing legal and local policies specific to their responsible areas.  Upon final review and research, the legal and local policies are presented to the Board of Trustees at a special or regular Board meeting for a first reading which includes an explanation of proposed policy changes.  At a subsequent meeting, the College President presents the College’s recommendation to the Board to add legal policies and add, revise, and/or delete local policies recommended by TASB policy services and/or any changes recommended on local policy by the College administration.  The Board has the sole right to adopt policies (BE LOCAL: Policy and Bylaw Development). This procedure is documented by the Board minutes dated August 18, 2011 (pg. 3, Item 6B), and August 16, 2012, (pg.4, Item 6C).

Section CQ (LEGAL) of College policy defines auxiliary services funds to be enterprise funds from self-supporting activities. Auxiliary funds are used in support of student activities, student scholarships, and special purpose events or operations as directed by Board of Trustees. Auxiliary enterprises that the College operates internally and funds received from contracted auxiliary services are included in the annual budget prepared for Board approval.

Internally operated auxiliary services are the childcare facility and dental hygiene care center in Beeville and the book stores located at every site. The College has one contracted auxiliary service for the Vanguard food and vending services. The contracted auxiliary services are administered by the Dean of Administrative Services, who reports to the President of the College. This individual also supervises the bookstore manager and prepares the contracts for auxiliary food services and acts as liaison with Vanguard food and vending including development of food plans for the dorm students in Beeville. The childcare facility operates under the Division Chair of Health Services and serves as faculty for the Early Development and Education division, which teaches child development and early childhood courses.

3.2.3    The governing board has a policy addressing conflict of interest for its members. (Board conflict of interest)

_X__  Compliance           ___  Partial Compliance          ___  Non-Compliance

Narrative:

The board is not controlled by a minority of board members or by organizations or interests separate from it. Neither the presiding officer of the board nor the majority of other voting members of the board have contractual, employment, personal or familial financial interest in the institution. Board Policy BBFA (LEGAL) addresses conflict of interest for its members.

Texas statutes govern the conduct of public officials, including elected board members for public community Colleges. The Texas Ethics Commission: A Guide to Ethics Law for State Officers and Employees (pg. 4) outlines laws that govern the standards of conduct and questions of conflict of interest for public servants.  Specifically, board members should not:

1 accept or solicit any gift, favor, or service that might reasonably tend to influence the officer or employee in the discharge of official duties or that the officer or employee knows or should know is being offered with the intent to influence the officer’s or employee’s official conduct;

2 accept other employment or engage in a business or professional activity that the officer or employee might reasonably expect would require or induce the officer or employee to disclose confidential information acquired by reason of the official position;

3 accept other employment or compensation that could reasonably be expected to impair the officer’s or employee’s independence of judgment in the performance of the officer’s or employee’s  official duties:

4  make personal investments that could reasonably be expected to create a substantial conflict between the officer’s or employee’s private interest and the public interest; or

5 intentionally or knowingly solicit, accept, or agree to accept any benefit for having exercised the officer’s or employee’s official powers or performed the officer’s or employee’s official duties in favor of another.

Further, Texas Government Code 572.058 requires elected officials to publically disclose any personal or private interest in a measure, proposal, or decision pending before a board and stipulate that they may not vote or otherwise participate in the decision. An official who violates this statute is subject to removal from office.

Board members are educated on these and other responsibilities by the College attorney. A Board retreat was held July 26, 2011, during which the board members were provided a copy of Board bylaws, a copy of Board policies, and a Reference Manual from the Texas Association of Community Colleges. At the retreat, the College attorney reviewed the duties and responsibilities of the Board, including the Statement of Ethics in the Board Bylaws.

3.2.4    The governing board is free from undue influence from political, religious, or other external bodies, and protects the institution from such influence. (External influence)

 

_X__  Compliance           ___  Partial Compliance          ___  Non-Compliance

 

Narrative: Coastal Bend College is protected from any external influence by its policy. Governing board members are “public servants” with specific restrictions and are prohibited from certain activities which are listed in Policy BBFB (LEGAL), such as bribery, acceptance of illegal gifts, acceptance of an honorarium, abuse of the office, and nepotism. Policy BBFA (LEGAL) requires a Board Member to abstain from further participation in certain situations.

 

The Board of Trustees consists of seven (7) elected members elected by the voters of Bee County and each member serves a six (6) year term.  One-third of the members are elected at large at regular elections; therefore, with a seven (7) member board two (2) of the members shall be elected in two (2) consecutive even-numbered years and three (3) shall elected in the following even-numbered years as outlined in Policy BBB (LEGAL).  None of the board members have contractual, employment, personal, familial, religious, or financial interest in the institution.  Individual Board Members do not exercise authority over the College District, its property, or its employees except for appropriate duties and functions, and individual members may act on behalf of the Board only with prior authorization of the Board as directed by Policy BBE (LOCAL).

 

The Texas Ethics Commission:  A Guide to Ethics Law for State Officers and Employees provides standards of conduct, questions, of conflict of interest, acceptance of gifts, and abuse of office.  Policy BBD (LEGAL) and BBD (LOCAL) require new board members to attend at least one (1) training program established by the Coordinating Board, and for the Board and College President to provide an orientation for new members to become familiar with Board functions, policies, and procedures.  Each Board Member must take the oath of office and within ninety (90) days after the election and each member shall complete training regarding the responsibilities under Texas Government Code Chapter 551 and Texas Government Code Chapter 552

 

There have been no instances documented regarding pressures by external agencies that have required board actions in the past two reaffirmation self-studies.

 

3.2.5    The governing board has a policy whereby members can be dismissed only for appropriate reasons and by a fair process. (Board dismissal) 

_X__  Compliance           ___  Partial Compliance          ___  Non-Compliance

 

Narrative: Coastal Bend College is well aware of the need for a strong governing body because the Board has the final authority to determine and interpret the policies which govern the College District, but at the same time, insure that individual Board Members shall not exercise authority over the College District as stated in Policy BBE (LOCAL). Policy BBC (LEGAL) documents the procedure for the involuntary removal of a governing Board Member from office and lists the reason for dismissal from office.  By request, the Attorney General or the county District Attorney may petition the district court for leave to file an action in quo warrant to remove a Board Member for any inappropriate activities:

1) Usurps, intrudes into, or unlawfully holds or executes a public office or

2) A public officer does an act or allows an act that by law causes forfeiture of office.

A resident of the state which meets the qualifications of residency and is not under indictment may file a petition to remove a public officer.  A proceeding will follow for removal by the filing of a written petition in a district county court in which the officer resides.  Reasons for removal include:

1)    incompetency,

2)     official misconduct, intoxication,

3)    conviction of any felony,

4)    conviction for a misdemeanor involving official misconduct,

5)    or nonattendance of Board meetings. 

Policy BBC (LEGAL) also documents the authority to dismiss a Board Member who is convicted of a purchasing offense and for official misconduct. This process has not been used for the past two reaffirmation self –studies.

 

3.2.6    There is a clear and appropriate distinction, in writing and practice, between the policy-making functions of the governing board and the responsibility of the administration and faculty to administer and implement policy. (Board/administration distinction)

_X__  Compliance           ___  Partial Compliance          ___  Non-Compliance

 

Narrative:   

There is a clear and appropriate distinction, in writing and practice, between the policy-making functions of the governing board and the responsibility of the administration and faculty to administer and implement policy. Coastal Bend College has a defined role for policy making and carrying out policy decisions from The Board of Trustees.  The Board shall have the exclusive power to manage and govern the College District as authorized by [BA (LEGAL)].  The Board is the keystone of the governance structure for the College and is expected to defend its right to manage its own affairs through chosen administrators and employees, enhance the public image, interpret the community to the campus and the campus to the community, to nurture the College District, and insist on clarity of focus and mission of the College District as addressed in BAA (LEGAL). 

 

The Board of Trustees is the policy making body and shall adopt such rules, regulations, and bylaws as it deems advisable and consistent with law as set forth in BE(LEGAL), and the College District shall be guided by Board-adopted policies that are distributed and are assessable to staff members, parents, students, and community residents. Any policies and policy amendments may be initiated by the College President, Board members, College personnel, students, or community citizens, but is usually recommended for the Board’s consideration by the College President as indicated in Policy BE (LOCAL).

The College President is the executive officer and works under the direction of the Board.  The College President directs the administration, faculty, and staff, and is the Chief Administrative Officer and all personnel employed by the College are responsible to the Board through the College President.  The College President recommends to the Board the faculty and other personnel to be employed, which is authorized by Policy BFA(LEGAL), and has the authority to adjust the administrative organization and make adjustments in personnel assignments, offices, titles, and duties, and is the official voice for communication with the Board in accordance with Policy BFA(LOCAL).

 

Policy BFA (LEGAL) also gives the College President and vice-presidents the authority to establish the procedures for curriculum development; although, most curriculum changes will be initiated by faculty members.  All administrators of the College have specific duties which are described in the job description for that position. The Board encourages faculty involvement in the planning of courses offered by the College and faculty initiative to search for new techniques for meeting student learning outcomes as stated in Policy EE (LOCAL).

 

The Board is the maker of “policy” and the College President “administers” policy.  The minutes of regular Board meetings illustrate the distinction in the Board’s duties and responsibilities and administrative duties and responsibilities.  Dr. Espinoza, the President of Coastal Bend College, has recently made adjustments in the organization and adjustments in personnel assignments for the College, and this is demonstrated by the new organization charts listed below as allowed by policy.

·         Vice-President of Student and Administrative Services Organization Chart

·         Vice-President of Instruction and Economic and Workforce Development Organization Chart

 

Example:  Board & Policy

The Board of Trustee revised the Out-of-District Travel Guidelines in DEE (EXIBIT).  This is documented by the November 18, 2010 Board minutes, (p.2, Item 6A). These Travel Guidelines were distributed again at the Fall Convocation 2012 to reaffirm no changes had been made since the last revision. Expense reports for Mr. Jaure and Mr. Lindeman are included to show new travel/reimbursement guidelines were followed.

Example: Presidential recommendation of employment/Board approval

The Board of Trustees is responsible for the continued employment of administration and professional employees.  Each must have the recommendation of the College President.  Faculty must be notified by mail by April 30th of each year as to whether he/she will be awarded another one (1) year contract as authorized by Policy DDA (LOCAL).  This procedure is documented in the March 22, 2012 minutes (#9 District Employees and Officers). 

 

Example; Faculty initiation of curriculum change

Chair of Preparatory Studies began the process of a curriculum change after attending the Developmental Education Initiative “Kick Off”.  She met with other representatives from other Colleges to get ideas for strategies.  Other DEI College representatives were contacted to compile the most recent data on the institutions initiatives that CBC was interested in initializing and hired consultants who had backgrounds in these specific strategy areas.  Workshops and meetings with instructors, staff, counselors, advisors, and administrators were held to target the best strategies for CBC.   CBC’s DEI Core Team met to discuss the logistics of initializing these strategies at our institution. The completed initiatives where then submitted to the President’s Cabinet and Faculty Association for review. The DEI Core Team met to review the current TSI Plan and insert the institutional changes.  This revised plan went through various readings and revisions.   In 2010 the revised plan was brought before the CBC College Board for approval.  It was approved in June 24, 2010, p.6, Item 6I. The Coastal Bend Texas Success Initiative Developmental Education Plan was officially revised after this approval.

 

3.2.7    The institution has a clearly defined and published organizational structure that delineates responsibility for the administration of policies. (Organizational structure)

 

_X__  Compliance           ___  Partial Compliance          ___  Non-Compliance

 

Narrative: The institution has a clearly defined and published organizational structure that delineates responsibility for the administration of polices.

The Board of Trustees is the sole authority for approving College policies.  The College Mission and the Annual Budget is also Board of Trustees approved items.  The College President is hired by the Board of Trustees and the College President is the executive officer of the Board and works under its direction.  BFA (LOCAL).

All personnel are recommended by the College President with ultimate Board approval.  All administrative, faculty, and staff positions are approved by the president prior to recommending to the Board.  The College President has the authority to adjust the administrative organization and make adjustments in personnel assignments, offices, titles, and duties as necessary to meet changing College needs.

 

The direct reports to the College President, as shown in the organizational chart, include the following:

·         Vice President of Student and Administrative Services,

·         Vice President of Instruction and Economic and Workforce Development,

·         Director of Business Services,

·         Director of Institutional Research Services

·         College Foundation Executive Director.

 

All personnel are part of these units and report to the appropriate vice president, dean or director.  The organizational charts for the two vice-presidents provide a schematic of the reporting and structure of the institution for those departments that do not report directly to the College president.

(Organizational chart – VP Student and Admin Services)  

Organizational chart – VP Instruction and Workforce and Economic Development

The responsibilities and duties of all personnel are provided in the job description for each position.  The job descriptions are on file at the Human Resources Office. The reporting structure is illustrated in the organizational chart, and the direct supervisor is also provided in the as shown in the example job description.

 

The College President is the only official voice for communication with the Board.  He or she may request the administration to present certain information when he or she so desires.  The job titles and credentials for all administrative personnel and faculty are listed in the College Catalog, pgs. 157 – 165.

 

 

3.2.8    The institution has qualified administrative and academic officers with the experience and competence to lead the institution. (Qualified administrative/academic officers)

 

_X__  Compliance           ___  Partial Compliance          ___  Non-Compliance

 

Narrative Coastal Bend College has qualified academic and administrative officers.  The credentials vary from individual to individual along with years of experience and time employed by the College.  The College organization chart illustrates the structure and the personnel information for the positions is listed.

The College President is appointed by the Board of Trustees (Board Policy (BFA Local, BFA Legal, BAA Legal)).  All other academic and administrative officers are responsible to the Board of Trustees through the College President.

The Board of Trustees determines the qualifications required of the College President and provides an annual evaluation.  The academic and administrative officers are also evaluated on an annual basis as required by College Board policy (DLA Local) 

Title

Name

Education

President

Dr. Beatriz Espinoza

B.S. University of Texas Pan American

M.S. University of Wisconsin-Madison

Ph.D. University of Wisconsin-Madison

Vice President of Instruction and     Workforce Education

Mark Secord

B.S. Biology University of Texas – El Paso

M.S. Wildlife Biology University of Montana – Missoula

Additional Graduate Studies Texas A&M University Corpus Christi

Vice President of Administration and Student Services

Velma Elizalde

A.S. Coastal Bend College

B.S. Texas A&M-Corpus Christi

M.S. Texas A&M University-Kingsville

Dean of Academics

Dr. Twila Johnson

B.A. English and History Texas A&M University-Kingsville

M.A. Political Science and History  Texas A&M University-Kingsville

Ed.D. Educational Leadership Texas A&M University-Kingsville

Dean of Workforce and Economic Development

Randy Lindeman

B.B.A. (Management)

Southwest Texas State University

Graduate Studies – Texas A&M – Corpus Christi

Dean of Administration

Kathlyn Patton

B.B.A Marketing Texas A&M University

M.B.A University Houston-Victoria

Additional Graduate Studies Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi

Dean of Student Services

Pete Trevino

B.A. Psychology & Sociology Texas A&M University-Kingsville

M.S. Psychology  Texas A&M University-Kingsville

 

3.2.9    The institution publishes policies regarding appointment, employment, and evaluation of all personnel. (Personnel appointment)

 

__X_  Compliance           ___  Partial Compliance          ___  Non-Compliance

 

Narrative The Board of Trustees appoints the College President and evaluates the College President BAA (LEGAL pg. 2 #15). Texas Education Code 51.352(d).  The College President recommends faculty and other employees of the College District with final approval by the Board of Trustees (BFA Local).

 

Filling of vacancies is important to the sustained life of the College.  The College President or designee advertises College District employment opportunities and establishes guidelines for posting notices of vacancies.  DC (LOCAL). The Board of Trustees is committed to equal opportunity employment.  For any vacancies, eligible employees may elect to apply.

 

All requests for employment must be approved by the College President.  The personnel requisition form shall be utilized for initiating and obtaining approval for recruitment. 

 

An application form will be provided to all applicants and shall be completed to become a recognized applicant.  All contractual positions shall be verified before a contract is offered.  Non-contractual positions shall be verified before hiring or as soon as possible thereafter.  The College District shall obtain a criminal history record on any person the College District intends to employ.  Prospective employees shall be required to sign a statement that acknowledges the College District will conduct a criminal history record check. 

 

The College District may not employ an individual who was a member of the Board of the College District before the first anniversary of the date the individual ceased to be a member of the Board. Education Code 130.089.  For new hires, the College District furnishes to the Directory of New Hires (Texas Attorney General’s Office) a report of new hires that includes name, address, and employer identification number.

 

The College Administration is responsible for developing and maintaining procedures and criteria for evaluation of all employees with the cooperation of division chairs and faculty evaluation committee.  DLA (LOCAL) The division chair is the immediate supervisor of the faculty member and at regular interval shall visit classes and hold conferences with each first-year instructor with the purpose of improving teaching.  All instructors are to be visited frequently enough to provide an accurate evaluation of their progress (Faculty Evaluation).  End of course student evaluation of faculty shall be conducted and a report available on the College District’s Web site (Board Policy - DLA Local).

 

Administrative Personnel shall become sufficiently familiar with the progress of instructors to make an accurate evaluation for retention or release of that instructor.  All final decision shall be the exclusive responsibility of the Board of Trustees.  Written evaluation shall be completed on all classified employees (Clerical Evaluations) with procedures established by the administration.

 

3.2.10  The institution periodically evaluates the effectiveness of its administrators. (Administrative staff evaluations)

_X__  Compliance           ___  Partial Compliance          ___  Non-Compliance

 

Narrative:   Coastal Bend College has a process for required employee evaluation for administrators.  DLA (LOCAL).  The College District administration is responsible to develop procedures and criteria for the performance and job evaluation of all professional employees.

 

Division chairs and division directors are responsible for the direct supervision and evaluation of faculty (Faculty Evaluation Form).  The Division chairs and division directors are supervised and evaluated by the Dean of Academic Programs and the Dean of Workforce and Economic Development (Division Chair Evaluation Form), depending on whether is program is academic or workforce.  Coastal Bend College utilizes the Professional Evaluation and Division Chair Evaluation Forms to provide documentation and objectivity in personnel evaluations.  All department heads directly supervise their direct reports and provide an annual evaluation of job performance for those in their areas (Clerical Evaluation Form).

The College President evaluates the Vice-Presidents at the College, which are new positions created in December 2012 by the president’s new organizational structure.  These positions were previously defined as the Dean of Instruction, Dean of Administrative Services, Dean of Student Services and Dean of Institutional Advancement.  The professional evaluation instrument is utilized for the periodic evaluation from the Vice-Presidents for the Dean of Student Services, Dean of Administrative Services, Dean of Workforce and Economic Development, and Dean of Academic Programs.  The Professional Evaluation Form includes:  Quality of Work, Quantity of Work, Professional Judgment and Responsibility, Technical Issues, Software, and a Performance Summary that allows the supervisor to provide comments regarding strengths, areas of development, and additional comments for development plans or general comments regarding the evaluation.

 

All personnel who provide job performance evaluations are required to complete evaluation training provided by the College’s Human Resources Department.  The presentation for evaluation information includes an overview of the Performance Evaluation Forms currently in use and are downloadable from the CBC Human Resources website.  The forms are saved as PDF and are accessible for evaluations.  Any questions regarding training or the process of evaluation can be answered by the Human Resources Director.  The training is beneficial to new and experienced administrators who are responsible for completing employee evaluations on an annual basis.  The forms and evaluation are signed by both the evaluator and the employee and placed in the permanent employee file located in the Human Resources Office.  The employee files are confidential.  DLA (LOCAL) requires that written evaluations be completed on all classified employees in accordance with procedures established by the administration.

 

The written evaluation does provide for comments for improvement.  If an employee is deficient in some areas, the supervisor may elect to create a Performance Improvement Plan.  This plan details the improvement areas of concentration along with a follow-up process and timeline for implementation.  The plan may call for a more frequent evaluation until improvement is observed and documented.

 

The Board of Trustees evaluates the College President, who is responsible as the chief administrative officer of the College.  Coastal Bend College evaluates the President on an annual basis (BAA LEGAL).

 

3.2.11  The institution’s chief executive officer has ultimate responsibility for, and exercises appropriate administrative and fiscal control over, the institution’s intercollegiate athletics program. (Control of intercollegiate athletics)

 

_X__  Compliance           ___  Partial Compliance          ___  Non-Compliance

 

Narrative The College President is the executive officer of the Board and the chief administrative officer.  The College President is the chief interpreter of all College activities, including all sports and athletics, to the community.  The College President recommends to the Board the plan of organization of the District.  Currently, the Dean of Student Services directly supervises the area of Student Life, which includes Sports/Athletics, according to the published Organizational Chart.  The Dean of Student Services reports to the Vice-President of Student and Administrative Services, who reports to the College President.

 

The College President prepares an annual budget for the College, which includes all sports and athletic activities, teams, and personnel.  The College President approves requisitions for purchases and expenditures for the programs of the College and controls all fund-raising activities for the support of the College and its programs BFA (LOCAL) which includes all intercollegiate athletic teams. 

 

All hiring of coaches and athletic related activities is approved by the College President and ultimately approved by the Board of Trustees from the recommendations of the President.

 

3.2.12  The institution demonstrates that its chief executive officer controls the institution’s fund-raising activities. (Fund-raising activities)

_X__  Compliance           ___  Partial Compliance          ___  Non-Compliance

 

Narrative:   Coastal Bend College is supported by the Coastal Bend College Foundation, which was incorporated as a separate 501 (c) 3 corporation in 2002, with a mission statement that was adopted on August 3, 2011.  The Coastal Bend College Foundation Mission Statement is:

 The mission of the Coastal Bend College Foundation is to generate and distribute resources to provide opportunities for excellence in education, promote innovative teaching, and partner with the community to enhance the quality of education for all students.

The Foundation is an independent entity with a separately elected board of directors that governs the foundation. Comprehensive Standard 3.2.13 further responds to the detail of the foundation.

 

The College president serves as a voting member of the Foundation Board of Directors.

In the bylaws that were adopted on Sept. 26, 2011, Article II Board of Directors, Section 2 states: The President of the Coastal Bend College shall hold a permanent official seat as a Director with one vote.

 

The Coastal Bend College Foundation Memorandum of Understanding that was mutually adopted by the College Board and the Foundation Board of Directors states in B4 Commitments: The president of the College and one member of the College Board shall serve as Directors of the Foundation Board and shall assume a prominent role in fund-raising activities.  In no event will these two members constitute a majority of the College Board.

In B8 of the Memorandum of Understanding it clearly states the role of the College President in relationship to the Foundation when it states:   “The College President will work closely with the Executive Director in conjunction with the leadership of the Foundation to identify, cultivate and solicit prospects for private gifts.” In addition, all other fundraising at the College is carried out under the authority and control of the College’s President. Full authority and responsibility for all administrative functions of the College, including any functions related to business, finance, and student services, are granted to the President by Board policy BFA (Local) pg.2, Item13, which states:.” The College President shall direct and control all fund-raising activities for the support of the College and its programs.”

Board Policy CAM (Local) authorizes the President to recommend to the Board in all cases the acceptance of gifts and donations to the College when it states:

 All bequests of property for the benefit of the College District shall vest the property in the Board.  When not specified by the grantor, funds or other property donated, or the income therefrom, may be expended in any manner authorized by statute.  The College President  shall make recommendations to the Board regarding the acceptance of gifts and donations including donor, value, form, and restrictions.  The authority to accept gifts shall be vested solely with the Board.”

The Board shall not accept gifts that discriminate against any person on the grounds of sex, race, color, religion, national origin, or disability.

Any bequests, gifts, or donations made by a donor totaling at least $10,000 within the calendar year shall be acknowledged with a certificate of recognition.”

In practice, the College President approves the submission of all grants to the College Foundation or to the College directly and additionally approves fundraising events by student clubs or for special projects.  The President assures in this way that all fundraising donations or projects meet the mission of the College.

 

3.2.13  For any entity organized separately from the institution and formed primarily for the purpose of supporting the institution or its programs: (1) the legal authority and operating control of the institution is clearly defined with respect to that entity; (2) the relationship of that entity to the institution and the extent of any liability arising out of that relationship is clearly described in a formal, written manner; and (3) the institution demonstrates that (a) the chief executive officer controls any fund-raising activities of that entity or (b) the fund-raising activities of that entity are defined in a formal, written manner which assures that those activities further the mission of the institution. (Institution-related entities)

 

_X__  Compliance           ___  Partial Compliance          ___  Non-Compliance

 

Narrative: (1) That the legal authority and operating control of the institution is clearly defined with respect to that entity being the Coastal Bend College Foundation is established in the Coastal Bend College Policy BBE (Local) Board Members Authority Foundation. It states the College Board’s authority to establish a foundation:

BBE (Local) The Board may establish a foundation in support of its operations.  Any such foundation shall operate independently of the College District under its own funding, governance, and articles of incorporation.  A member of the Board and the College President shall serve as members of the foundation, providing information on the College District and its needs, but their membership shall not constitute the majority of the foundation board.

(2) In the Coastal Bend College Policy Manual CAM (Legal) Transfer of Funds to Non Profit Foundation, the authority of the College Board to transfer funds to a nonprofit corporation is established.  Thus, the relationship of that entity (the CBC Foundation) to the institution and the extent of any liability arising out of that relationship are clearly described in a formal, written manner.  CAM (Legal) states:

Charitable trust funds donated to the College District for the restricted purpose of providing scholarships to needy students of the College District are not general assets of the College District. Accordingly, should the Trustees of the College District as trustee of these funds view the administrative costs associated with their retaining control of the funds as substantially impairing the accomplishment of the trust purpose, the trustees may petition a court of competent jurisdiction to modify the trust under Property Code 112.054, substituting as trustees over the funds the trustees of a nonprofit corporation created to provide support to the College District, subject to the continuing restriction that the funds may only be used for their original purpose as scholarship funds. Because of the trust impressed upon these funds, the constitutional restrictions on the donation of public money or credit to a private entity would

not be implicated by such a consolidation. However, any grant of general College District funds by the Trustees to the foundation would implicate such constitutional questions. Atty. Gen. Op. JC- 0138 (1999)

 

(3) “The institution demonstrates that (a) the chief executive officer controls any fund-raising activities of that entity or (b) the fund-raising activities of that entity are defined in a formal, written manner which assures that those activities further the mission of the institution.”  Coastal Bend College Policy Manual clearly states in BFA (Local), pg. 2, Item13:

“The College President shall direct and control all fund-raising activities for the support of the College and its programs”. In addition, the College President sits on the board of the Coastal Bend College Foundation as a voting member.  In the bylaws that were adopted on Sept. 26, 2011, Article II Board of Directors, Section 2 states: “The President of the Coastal Bend College shall hold a permanent official seat as a Director with one vote”.

The Coastal Bend College Foundation Memorandum of Understanding that was mutually adopted by the College Board and the Foundation Board of Directors states in B4 Commitments: “The president of the College and one member of the College Board shall serve as Directors of the Foundation Board and shall assume a prominent role in fund-raising activities.  In no event will these two members constitute a majority of the College Board.”

In B8 of the Memorandum of Understanding it clearly states the role of the College President in relationship to the Foundation when it states:   “The College President will work closely with the Executive Director in conjunction with the leadership of the Foundation to identify, cultivate and solicit prospects for private gifts.

 

3.2.14  The institution’s policies are clear concerning ownership of materials, compensation, copyright issues, and the use of revenue derived from the creation and production of all intellectual property. These policies apply to students, faculty, and staff. (Intellectual property rights)

 

_X__  Compliance           ___  Partial Compliance          ___  Non-Compliance

 

Narrative:   Coastal Bend College policies directly address the issue of intellectual property of faculty, staff, and students.  DBD (Legal) states that an employee who develops intellectual property may own or be awarded any amount of equity interest in the property.  The policy also states that with Board of Trustee approval, the employee may serve as an officer or employee of a business entity that has an agreement relating to the research, development, licensing, or exploitation of the at intellectual property without creating a conflict of interest.

Conforming to legislative requirements, patentable products and copyrightable materials may emerge and be developed by College District employees in the pursuit of scholarly activities.  The general intent of the College District to provide ownership of all licenses, developments, copyrights, and patents to be the sold property of the individual(s) and not of the institution, except as limited in the specific policy statements (DBD Local).  The copyright or patentable works created by student(s) or a third party, shall reside with the author creator as well.

All intellectual property must be clearly identified as to ownership and licensing responsibilities.  Copyright materials, patentable products, and trade secrets that have been developed by College District employees in the performance of assigned College District duties are owned solely by the individual provided:  The College District maintains use of the materials.  The employee is responsible for licensing expenses.  The employee shall reimburse the College District for costs in development.  The College President or designee does not make a claim to ownership or copyright.

 

If the patentable product is developed in the performance of job duties, the ownership may be shared if the President makes a written claim.  The College District will have no claim if intellectual property of the employee was developed on the employee’s own time.  The right to revise copyright material shall remain with the employee if the revised material is made to the College District for free and unrestricted use.

 

If the sharing and distribution of intellectual property results in a business venture, the producer shall be allowed a share of the equity.  Details regarding percentages shall be negotiated on an individual basis.  The College District shall have no claim to royalties of intellectual property unless claimed in writing by the College President on behalf of the Board of Trustees.

 

3.3.1    The institution identifies expected outcomes, assesses the extent to which it achieves these outcomes, and provides evidence of improvement based on analysis of the results in each of the following areas: (Institutional effectiveness)

3.3.1.1  Educational programs, to include student learning outcomes

_X__  Compliance           ___  Partial Compliance          ___  Non-Compliance

 

Narrative Coastal Bend College offers the Associate of Arts Degree, the Associate of Science Degree, 18 Associate of Applied Science Degrees ,and 15 Certificates of Achievement in specialized workforce education fields.

 

During the last accreditation process, the institution adopted the  Nichols Five-Column Model for Instructional unit assessment of student learning outcomes (SLOs)  The selected Five-Column Model requires each instructional program/department to link its program to the mission of the College (column 1), identify expected student learning outcomes (column 2), establish a means of assessment and the criteria for success for each outcome (column 3), document the assessment results, compare against the stated targets in column 3 to determine if assessment results were met, (column 4), and analyze the  assessment results in order to identify a program improvement plan or plans if targets are not reached (column 5).  (The links provide an example of a completed assessment plan for an academic department and workforce program.) The assessment cycle began September 1 of each year and ended on August 31 of the following year. This cycle paralleled the academic year.

 

All instructional programs and/or divisions are expected to identify five to seven SLOs at the course level each year that program or department faculty have determined should be evaluated.  (Program level outcomes are identified and assessed in the Program Review process discussed in Core Requirement 2.5 in Section 2). Types of assessment used are determined by the faculty, but the process requests two measures for each SLO, with targets established for each. If for some reason only one measure can be identified for the SLO, this measure must be a direct measure.  Opinion surveys, focus groups, or other indirect measures may be used as a second means of assessment.

 

            Data are generated and compared to the established targets and further analyzed by the faculty and division chairs. It is expected that outcomes assessment data that do not meet or exceed the targets would then generate an improvement program or process within the course designed to move the students towards successful attainment of the target.  If the improvement program/process involves a request for funds, budget implications are listed in this area.

This SLO is then re-assessed the following cycle to determine if the program improvement yielded a successful outcome of target attainment.  This process repeated each year, as student learning outcomes assessment follows a yearly cycle.

In August 2010, the decision was made to purchase a web-based accountability system for tracking SLO assessments, TaskStream AMS, in order to improve both the timeliness and quality of assessment planning by instructional programs. By moving assessment planning and reporting to a web-based environment, faculty now have 24/7 access to their planning and assessment instruments for multiple years and can enter or edit information any time there is access to the Internet.  Assessment plans and data from 2004-2009 continue to be inputted into TaskStream for archiving and access purposes.   However, bound copies of those cycles are available in the Office of Institutional Research Services.  Assessment plans from 2010 until present are included in TaskStream.  Course level assessment plans for the past three (3) years can be accessed using these links for 2009-10, 2010-11, and 2011-12.

TaskStream assessment reporting screens have been customized to mirror as much as possible the structure of the Nichols 5-Column Model that has been used by CBC since November of 2004. The workspaces begin with a standing requirement for a unit mission statement, which would be included in the first column of the previous assessment model.  After this has been completed the user can move through the assessment cycles from 2004 until present, select the cycle to input assessment information and either update data or enter new assessment plans.

The Objectives link (Academic Objectives for Instructional Programs; Administrative Objectives for Administrative and Educational Support (AES) Units) allows users to input student learning outcomes or administrative objectives of the unit into the system, and provides the linkage, or mapping, or the outcomes to the institution’s Strategic Plan.  This corresponds to column 2 of the previous assessment model.

After objectives have been entered and mapped, the Means of Assessment link provides the opportunity to input a description of the unit’s plan to assess the objectives listed in the previous link, as well as define the targets that, if equaled or surpassed in the assessment data , would indicate a successful assessment.  Unit managers relate this link to column 3 of the 5-column model.

A Summary of Data/Use of Results link is the last link of an assessment cycle, corresponds to columns 4 and 5 of the Nichols 5-Column Model, and allows the user to input the data from their assessment activities.  This area should be a very explicit description of the data obtained from the unit’s assessment, and allow for comparison of the results with the targets established in the Means of Assessment portion of the planning cycle. Once this data have been analyzed, any improvement plan or plans that the unit wants to initiate as a result of the assessment is entered, along with any associated costs necessary to implement the improvement plan.  This “closes the loop” for the assessment of an objective for the cycle and any improvement plans are re-assessed after implementation during the next appropriate cycle. Links in the table below provide examples of the student learning outcomes assessment process.

Three Year Submissions of Instructional SLO Assessment Models

 Program

2009-10

2010-11

2011-12

Accounting

x

x

x

Airframe and PowerPlant Tech

x

x

x

Automotive

New person

x

x

Natural Sciences

x

x

x

Early Childhood Development

x

x

x

Developmental Math

x

x

x

Developmental Reading

x

x

x

Developmental English

x

x

x

Computer Information Tech

x

x

x

Cosmetology

x

x

x

Dental Hygiene

x

x

x

Drafting

Incomplete

x

New person

Health Information Tech

x

x

x

Kinesiology

x

x

x

Language

x

x

x

Machinist

x

x

x

Math

New person

x

x

Nursing

Director illness

NO SLO

NO SLO

Oil & Gas Technology

New person

Not complete

Not complete

Professional Business Tech

x

x

x

Protective Services

x

x

Not complete

Radiography Tech

x

x

x

Social Sciences/Humanities

not combined 

x

x

Visual Arts

x

x

x

Assessment Cycle

Coastal Bend College’s cycle for assessment for student learning outcomes had paralleled its academic year (September 1 – August 31) in that student learning outcomes/objectives, assessment plans, and targets for instructional programs were expected to be completed by September 30 of each year, with assessment data and improvement plans completed by August 31.  Department faculty determines which semester or semesters during the cycle the SLOs will be assessed, depending on when the course is offered.  Because the revised assessment management system is web-based, units may input assessment data as it is received at any point in the cycle.

The decision was made during the January 7, 2013 President’s Leadership Team weekly meeting to adjust the cycle to follow the calendar year instead of the academic year.  Hence, the new Assessment Cycle for all instructional units began January 1 and will end December 31 of each year.  This timeline also allows instructional programs and departments to simultaneously report on SLO assessments as well as program goal assessment as part of the College Program Review process covered in Core Requirement 2.5 in Section 2.  Instructional programs are required to identify and assess program outcomes in addition to SLOs.

Once TaskStream was introduced, training sessions were offered by the IR office from December 2010 through March 2011 to any faculty and staff responsible for preparing and submitting assessment plans in their area. The IR office maintains an open-door policy with respect to assisting employees with TaskStream questions, and holds sessions on TaskStream during In-service (pg. 10).

Initial Program Review

The institution began an Instructional Program Review (IPR) program in 2007.  The IPR was a systematic process for the collection, analysis, and interpretation of data concerning an instructional program and its curriculum and is utilized in making recommendations to improve the effectiveness of the program and its impact on student learning.  It was a means of ensuring that the College’s programs are effective and responsive to the local College community within the limitations of available resources.  The major objectives of IPR were to: (1) identify and articulate instructional program goals and align them with the College’s mission and goals; (2) collect and analyze data on key performance indicators, student learning outcomes, program activities, and accomplishments; (3) document and discuss the effectiveness of instructional programs; (4) develop recommendations and strategies concerning future program directions and needs (e.g. budget, staffing, and resources); and (5) assure the accuracy of program information.

 

When Coastal Bend College’s incumbent president resigned in December 2011 to accept a position with another institution and Dr. Beatriz Espinoza became president of CBC on June 1, 2012, one of her first priorities was to re-emphasize data-based decision-making in all areas of the College operations. From an Institutional Effectiveness standpoint, this meant that all budgeting decisions for instructional as well as administrative support units must be made based on data. This necessitated a change in the way CBC approached the program review process.

 

As a first step, the president required all College instructional and administrative units to complete a revised program review during the fall 2012 semester, following the process outlined in the Coastal Bend College Program Review Handbook.  Each unit reviewed staffing, technology, materials and supplies usage, travel and other budget line items in order to maximize the use of College funds.  All were charged with determining their department’s total cost of ownership and return on investment. After analysis of these areas, department targets were set for the next three years, with annual assessment plans and measures developed and implemented to track progress towards these targets.  The program review process implemented by the new president clearly expressed that no increases in department budgets would be considered without submission of program review recommendations based on data that indicates the increase is necessary for student success.  In other words, data would drive the budget. Program Review is explained in greater detail in Core Requirement 2.5 in Section 2.

 

Assessment of the targets for all departments is to begin in the spring 2013 semester and continue through each unit’s assigned cycle.  In order to create an ongoing, systematic, institution-wide process, some units have back-to-back self- studies that are necessary to establish the cyclical structure located in CBC Program Review Handbook.2012-2016, Appendix A, pages 11-13.  In all cases, data are generated and used as the basis for identifying unit outcomes, targets and measures to assess effective of the unit operations. Documentation of program review targets and measures assessment will be uploaded to the TaskStream Accountability Management System, a web-based, managed-server tool for planning and assessment activities. Annual updates on the progress of the outcomes and improvement plans are filed at the end of each year using the template provided in the Program Review Handbook.  A sample is provided using the first instructional program to complete the process, Radiography Technology.

 

3.3.1.2. administrative support services

__X_  Compliance           ___  Partial Compliance          ___  Non-Compliance

Narrative:  For clarity it should be noted that Administrative Support Services and Academic and Student Support Services have, since the adoption by the College of the Nichols 5-Column Model in 2004, been combined as Administrative and Educational Support Services (AES) for assessment references. They have been separated here to answer the Compliance Certification principles.

NOTE:  (x) is a link to the assessment plan for the year it is below

Administrative Support Unit Assessment Plan Report

 Department

2009-10

2010-11

2011-12

President

Did not file

Did not file

Interim in place

Admin Services

New person

Did not file

Retired

Human Resources

x

x

x

Admissions/Registrar

x

x

x

Institutional Research

x

x

x

Financial Aid

x

x

x

Institutional Advancement

N/A

N/A

New director

Alice Site

New director

x

x

Kingsville Site

x

x

x

Pleasanton Site

x

x

x

Computer Center

x

x

x

Bookstore

x

New manager

x

Data Center

x

x

x

Physical Plant

new director

x

incomplete

 

Administrative Support Service departments have followed the same process for outcomes assessment as instructional programs described in CS 3.3.1.1 since 2004. IE Days are College-wide workdays and offices that can close without disrupting critical services participate in the same manner as instructional programs. All departments create and publish a mission statement as the first item in TaskStream. Instead of student learning outcomes, these support departments identify administrative objectives (five to seven each year) through meetings with department employees and end-users of their services that measure the quality, effectiveness or impact of the services that support student success.

 

Once the objectives and means of assessment for the assessment cycle have been identified, measures and targets are established to gauge expected performance against the data from the assessment plans. The data are gathered and inputted into the Summary of Data/Use of Results section of TaskStream, compared against the expected targets that would determine success of the objective, and analyzed.  Improvement programs or processes are expected to be developed and implemented if the targets are not met, and are identified within the Use of Results section.  Those objectives that have improvements identified are then re-assessed the following cycle. Any budget implications are identified within the improvement plan and submitted within the completed assessment document, which until 2010 had been the Nichols 5-Column Model.  Administrative Support units enter their assessment information into the TaskStream Accountability Management also used by the instructional programs. 

These objectives have now been combined into the CBC Program Review process described in CS 3.3.1.1.  They are assessed throughout the life of the unit’s review cycle, with results reported at the end of each year using the Annual Update template provided in the Program Review Handbook.

 

3.3.1.3  Academic and student support services

__X_  Compliance           ___  Partial Compliance          ___  Non-Compliance

 

Narrative:  Academic and Student Support departments have followed the same process for outcomes assessment as instructional programs described in CS 3.3.1.1 and CS 3.3.1.1 since 2004. These support departments identify may identify student learning outcomes and/or  administrative objectives (five to seven each year) through conversations with department employees, students and end-users of their services that may increase the quantity, quality or effectiveness of the services that support student success.

 

Mission statements are created and published as the first section of the assessment plan. Once the objectives/student outcomes and means of assessment for the assessment cycle have been identified, measures and targets are established to gauge expected performance against the data from the assessment plans. The data are gathered, compared against the expected targets that would determine success of the objective, and listed in the Summary of Data section.  Improvement programs or processes are expected to be developed and implemented if the targets are not met.  Those objectives that have improvements identified are published in the Use of Results section, along with any budget implications needed to implement the improvement plan, and are then re-assessed the following cycle. Any budget implications are identified within the improvement plan and submitted within the completed assessment document, which until 2010 had been the Nichols 5-Column Model.  Academic and Student Support units now enter this information into the TaskStream Accountability Management used by the instructional programs and administrative support services departments. 

 

These objectives have now been combined into the CBC Program Review process described in CR 2.5 and CS 3.3.1.1.  They are assessed throughout the life of the unit’s review cycle, with results reported at the end of each year using the Annual Update template provided in the Program Review Handbook.

 

The table below links the departments to their assessment plans for the preceding three (3) years.  The information was presented to the Board of Trustees in December 2012, pg. 3, Item 6B).

NOTE:  (x) is a link to the assessment plan for the year it is below.

Three Year Submissions of Student Support Units Assessment Plans

 Department

2009-10

2010-11

2011-12

Dean- Instructional Programs

New person

x

x

Athletics

incomplete

new coordinator

x

Dean - Student Services

x

x

x

Dual Credit

Did not exist

Did not exist

x

ETS - Alice

x

x

x

Library

x

x

x

STEM Grant

Did not exist

Did not exist

x

Student Life

No coordinator

x

x

Testing Center

 x

x

x

Title V

x

x

Ended

Title V Celebrando Education

Did not exist

Did not exist

x

TRIO

x

x

x

UB GOST

x

x

x

 

 

3.3.1.4  research within its mission, if appropriate

___  Compliance           ___  Partial Compliance          ___  Non-Compliance

Narrative:   This standard is not within the mission of Coastal Bend College.

 

3.3.1.5  community/public service within its mission, if appropriate

__X_  Compliance           ___  Partial Compliance          ___  Non-Compliance

 

Narrative:   The Continuing Education, Prison Programs and ABE department have been following the same process for identifying and assessing unit objectives as the departments covered in CS 3.3.1.2 and CS 3.3.1.3 since 2004, and use the same reporting tools (Nichols 5-Column Model from 2004 to 2009, and TaskStream from 2010 to present).  Their cycle mirrors the other major assessment areas identified in CS 3.3.1., and reported in the previous sections 3.3.1.2 and 3.3.1.3.

NOTE:  (x) is a link to the assessment plan for the year it is below.

Three Year Submissions of Student Support Units Assessment Plans

 Department

2009-10

2010-11

2011-12

ABE

New director

new director

new director

Cont. Education

x

x

retired

Prison Programs

New director

x

x

 

 

3.3.2    The institution has developed a Quality Enhancement Plan that (1) demonstrates institutional capability for the initiation, implementation, and completion of the QEP; (2) includes broad-based involvement of institutional constituencies in the development and proposed implementation of the QEP; and (3) identifies goals and a plan to assess their achievement. (Quality Enhancement Plan)  (Note:  This requirement is not addressed by the institution in its Compliance Certification.)

 

Not addressed by Coastal Bend College in its Compliance Certification.

PROGRAMS

3.4 All Educational Programs

3.4.1    The institution demonstrates that each educational program for which academic credit is awarded is approved by the faculty and the administration. (Academic program approval)

__X_  Compliance           ___  Partial Compliance          ___  Non-Compliance

Narrative:  Coastal Bend College Board Policy EE (LOCAL) Curriculum Development is the mechanism by which every educational program awarding academic credit is approved.  This and other board policies related to instructional programs [EFAA (LEGAL), EFAB (LEGAL), EFAB (LOCAL)], and curriculum design [EFA (LEGAL), EFB (LEGAL)] adhere to the Texas Administrative Codes of the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board and its guide manuals for academic        (Lower-Division  Academic Course Guide Manual) and workforce (Guidelines for Instructional Programs in Workforce Education) programs. 

Approved by Faculty

Existing educational programs have passed rigorous scrutiny by the institution’s Board of Trustees, Advisory Committee members, and faculty, in meeting legislative and regional accrediting mandates. The Board of Trustees encourages the development and revision of curriculum by faculty and division chairpersons EE (LOCAL) . College policy mandates that “The overall programs of the College District shall be continually reappraised to assure that the courses offered meet the needs of the community and the students.”  Initiation of curriculum changes typically begins at the faculty level.  This ongoing approval process involves program faculty that evaluate existing courses to determine their relevance and currency in achieving course/program objectives.  The first step in the process is for program faculty and division chairs to recommend appropriate revisions to the curriculum; workforce division programs also present proposed changes to their respective advisory committees, gaining input on industry needs and graduate marketability.  All proposed curriculum changes are presented to the instructional deans and Vice-President of Instruction.  Changes are also presented to the catalog and curriculum committee whose membership is composed of all division chairs.

 

Revisions to existing programs that alter the number of semester credit hours must be submitted to the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board.  If the revision results in a reduction in the number of overall semester credit hours required for the degree, it will automatically be approved.   If the change results in an increase in semester credit hours, it must be reviewed and approved by the Coordinating Board.  Revisions that do not result in a change in the required semester credit hours do not require Coordinating Board approval or notification. Any changes to the core curricula must be submitted to the Division of Workforce, Academic Affairs, and Research (WARR) at the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board for review and approval.  A change in the core curricula is defined as any addition, or deletion, of courses, a change in the number of semester credit hours (SCH) required in a component area, and any change in the overall number of SCH required to complete the core curriculum.  Upon receipt of approval from the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, the program curriculum change is enacted and published in the college catalog.

 

The establishment of new academic associate degree programs must follow the implementation criteria of the Texas Administrative Code.  19 TAC 9.184  Detailed studies of long-term student demand for a new program, enrollment projections for program financial sustainability, as well as articulation agreements and transfer of curriculum credit must be completed before the approval process begins.  Board of Trustees’ minutes and actions regarding the establishment of the Pharmacy Technician Program  demonstrates the approval process.  If all Administrative Code requirements are met then approval of the new academic associate degree program by the Coordinating Board is automatic [EFB (LEGAL)].

Approved by Administration

Administration and faculty are currently engaged in re-evaluating the institution’s core curriculum.  New policies and procedures related to the Texas Core Curriculum will be in effect in the fall of 2014. Submission deadline for the proposed 40 hour maximum core curriculum, which includes six hours of component area option courses that are institutionally designated, is November 30, 2013.  A Core Curriculum Committee comprised of division chairs and directed by the Dean of Academics is in place and a new core curriculum is being developed.  As per the guidelines of the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, this process is being faculty driven.  All course selections, mapping of core objectives and development of assessment measures are being conducted by the academic division chairs.

 

3.4.2    The institution’s continuing education, outreach, and service programs are consistent with the institution’s mission. (Continuing education/service programs)

 

_X__  Compliance           ___  Partial Compliance          ___  Non-Compliance

 

Narrative:  The missions of the continuing education, outreach, and service programs within Coastal Bend College are consistent with the institution’s mission statement.  Each of these programs is an integral part of the overall College mission, purpose, and responsibility as set forth in policy at both the state level [AD (LEGAL)] and the local level  [AD (LOCAL)]. 

Educational Role, Mission, Purpose and Responsibility

AD (LEGAL) - “The College District shall be a two-year institution primarily serving its local taxing district and service area and offering vocational, technical, and academic courses for certification or associate degrees.  Continuing education, remedial and compensatory education consistent with open-admission policies, and programs of counseling and guidance shall be provided.  The College District shall insist on excellence in all academic area—instruction, research, and public service” Faculty research, using the facilities provided for and consistent with the primary function of the College District is encouraged.  Funding for research should be from private sources, competitively acquired sources, local taxes, and other local revenue. 

Education Code 130.0011

Purpose

The purpose of the College District shall be to provide:

1.       Technical programs up to two years in length leading to associate degrees or certificates.

2.       Vocational programs leading directly to employment in semi-skilled and skilled occupations.

3.       Freshman and sophomore courses in arts and sciences. 

4.       Continuing adult education programs for occupational or cultural upgrading.

5.       Compensatory education programs designed to fulfill the commitment of an admissions policy allowing the enrollment of disadvantaged students.

6.       A continuing program of counseling and guidance designed to assist students in achieving their individual educational goals.

7.       Work force development programs designed to meet local and statewide needs.

8.       Adult literacy and other basic skills programs for adults.

9.       Other purposes as may be prescribed by the Coordinating Board, or the College District’s Board. Education Code 130.003(e)

Institutional Responsibility

In addition to specific responsibilities imposed by the Education Code or other law, the College District has the general responsibility to serve the public and, within the College District’s role and mission, to:

1.    Transmit culture through general education.

2.    Extend knowledge.

3.    Teach and train students for professions.

4.    Provide for scientific, engineering, medical, and other academic research.

5.    Protect intellectual exploration and academic freedom. 

6.    Strive for intellectual excellence.

7.    Provide educational opportunity for all who can benefit from postsecondary education and training. 

8.    Provide continuing education opportunities.        

Education Code 51.354   

Mission

The College District is a comprehensive, public community College serving a diverse South Texas area. It is a student-centered institution committed to the highest integrity and to the development of an educational culture that supports creativity, encourages professional development, and promotes excellence in all areas.

 

The goals of the College District shall be to:

1.     Provide technical/vocational programs leading to associate degrees or certificates;

2.     Provide postsecondary freshman and sophomore courses in arts and sciences that transfer to senior  

        postsecondary institutions and that lead to associate degrees;

3.     Support local and statewide needs for occupational upgrading and workforce development through

         adult literacy, education, and retraining programs;

4.     Provide access to postsecondary education with an open admissions policy that includes developmental education programs;

5.     Enhance the learning environment by providing support services to meet the requirements of educational programs, faculty, and students;

6.     Maintain a campus conducive to learning; that is environmentally and functionally safe, accessible, attractive, and well-equipped;

7.     Provide counseling, educational advising, job placement and guidance programs to assist students in achieving their educational, personal, and career goals.

 

Outreach and Service Programs

Outreach and Services Programs constitute a myriad of services at Coastal Bend College: counseling, advising, financial aid, library and learning assistance, and TRIO. 

 

Counseling and Advising

The Counseling Department provides educational and Special Needs Counseling.  Counselors guide all students seeking help with programs of study and degree plans, dual credit, housing, and tutoring.  Cougar Days, which is a freshman orientation event, offers opportunities for students and counselors to meet and exchange information about the College, specific fields of study, campus services, and registration.  Professional counselors (master degree credentialed) and advisors are available at all campus sites and hold degrees in counseling, psychology, social work, or closely related field.  A key responsibility for counselors is providing equal opportunities for students with learning and/or physical disabilities.  Special Needs Counselors explain the process to those requesting services and reasonable accommodations.  Counselors also assist students needing guidance with personal, developmental, social, and career issues.  They teach strategies which help students solve problems, make decisions, change behaviors, and accept responsibilities—providing referral services as needed.  Counselors work to improve the College environment by minimizing educational obstacles while maximizing personal and scholastic success of students.

 

Counseling staff or faculty advisors interview students prior to enrollment.  They ensure placement in appropriate courses as determined by the Texas Higher Education Assessment (THEA) or ACCUPLACER test scores  Advisors place students in College preparatory classes if test results indicate a need to improve academic skills.  This allows students an opportunity to develop College level skills and provides an increased likelihood of academic success.

 

Student Success Center

The CBC Student Success Centers (SSC) offer free services to help students improve academic skills and increase their chances for success.  The SSC offers Internet access and computerized courses for review or testing.   The network is available for word-processing assignments.  Computer-assisted instruction is user friendly and easy to use even for those who are unfamiliar with computers.  Testing is another function of the SSC.  State approved exams used for placement are administered and announced throughout each semester.  Other services include online study skills instruction, Internet student advising, online library resources, tutoring, and online library resources.  In addition, the Tutor Coordinator schedules group review and study sessions led by peer tutors and faculty members in high need subject areas.  Free courses are offered by the learning assistance center via the Internet.  These include topics in English, mathematics, reading, and study skills. Similar courses in the form of three-hour seminars are also offered for adults from the community enrolled in adult basic education.

 

Learning Resource Center

The major collection of books and periodicals is housed in the CBC central library, the Grady Hogue Learning Resource Center (LRC).  Resource formats include print, electronic, CD-ROM, video, microfilm, cassette, slides, and DVD.  Texshare contains approximately 250 databases offering full-text journal articles and full-text book excerpts, online encyclopedias, and Spanish language resources.  Several EBSCOHost databases including individual databases or those grouped under Health and Wellness, Academic, and Science and Technology are provided. Academic Search Premiere includes CINAHL Plus with full text, an expensive and highly recognized allied health resource.  The LRC also subscribes to large ebook collections (CBC has over 50,000 ebooks available on a variety of topics).  Further, CBC has purchased annual community College ebook collections made available through the AMIGOS library consortium.  These collections include resources for allied health programs typically taught in community Colleges.  Finally JSTOR, a database of full-text journal articles and article citations on all topics, is available for our students.  An alphabetical list of the LRC subscription databases is available on the CBC webpage.  Current and back issues of major scientific and professional journals related to nursing and allied health can be accessed online, within the library holdings, or via microfilm.  The Texas State Library Communications Network offers interlibrary loans; requests are initiated through the library staff.  These resources support the curriculum by providing access to the most current information available. 

 

Financial Aid

The Financial Aid Department assists students in applying for Federal Pell Grants, Federal Student Loans, Campus Based Aid, College Work Study, scholarships, and daycare assistance.  The Dreamkeepers Emergency Financial Aid Program provides monetary relief to students for sudden, unexpected, unforeseen circumstances demanding immediate action and attention of the student (not an ongoing expense) which significantly interferes with the student’s ability to continue to access higher education.  The Director of Financial Aid assists students with the program’s guidelines and procedures. 

 

The Office of Veterans Affairs assists all eligible veterans obtain financial assistance and information on Veterans Benefits while they attend Coastal Bend College. The College participates in educational programs provided by the Department of Veterans Affairs. These programs include:

 

Student Services TRIO

The Student Services TRIO includes eight programs targeted to serve and assist low-income individuals, first-generation College students, and individuals with disabilities to progress through the academic pipeline from middle school to post baccalaureate programs. Coastal Bend College has the following TRIO programs available: Student Support Services, Talent Search (Alice & Beeville campus), Upward Bound, & Upward Bound - G.O.S.T. (George West, Odem Sinton & Taft).   Additional information is also included: what TRIO is, an overview of student support services, applicant guidelines, and mission statement:

 

Student Support Services is a federally funded TRIO Program designed to identify College students with academic potential from disadvantaged backgrounds (low-income, first generation, and disabled). The program strives to increase students' retention, graduation, and transfer rates. A number of services including tutoring, career and financial aid counseling, and grant aid opportunities are provided in a warm and encouraging environment.  (TRIO)

 

Talent Search Program

Coastal Bend College in Alice and Beeville, Texas, currently hosts the Talent Search Program which was originally funded in 1976. The Talent Search Program identifies and assists individuals from disadvantaged backgrounds who have the potential to succeed in higher education. The program provides academic, career, and financial counseling to its participants and encourages them to graduate from high school and continue on to the postsecondary institution of their choice. Talent Search also serves high school dropouts by encouraging them to reenter the education system and complete their education. The goal of Talent Search is to increase the number of youths from disadvantaged backgrounds who complete high school and enroll in postsecondary education institutions of their choice. The number of participants in Alice, Texas to be served each year by this project: 616. The annual budget is $250,000.  The number of participants in Beeville, Texas, to be served each year by this project: 671. The annual budget is $306,752.

 

Upward Bound

·         Upward Bound is a free, year round College preparatory program for high school students. It is 100% grant funded by the federal government with an annual award of $388,333. The goal of the program is to prepare low income, potential first generation College bound students for success in postsecondary education. Students attending a target school in Beeville, Mathis, Pettus, or Skidmore must qualify in order to be selected. Once selected, students remain in the program until their graduation from high school and completion of their first summer semester of university. Eligibility Requirements are that the students must be:

·          Low-income and/or potential first-generation College bound (neither parent has a bachelor's degree)

·         At least 13 years old

·         Entering the 9th, or 10th grade of high school

·         Be a student attending a target school

·         5. Be a citizen, national, or a permanent resident of the U.S.

 

Academic Year

September through May, students attend classes on specified Saturdays a month from 9:00 am to 2:00 pm. Instruction is offered in mathematics, English, reading, writing, study skills, speech, government, career awareness and related topics.

Summer Component
  Starting in June, the students attend classes for six weeks. Classes, cultural events and field trips are held from Monday through Thursday, 9:00 am to 5:00 pm. The summer program offers instruction in mathematics, English, science, foreign languages, life management skills and computer science.

Bridge Program
  After graduating from high school, qualifying Upward Bound students enroll at Coastal Bend College for their first summer semester. Students are assisted with the admissions and financial aid processes, as well as their academic transition to College. Tutoring, counseling and various other services are also offered. The bridge program provides tuition, housing, books and supplies.

 

Upward Bound G.O.S.T.

The same College preparatory program is extended to high school students in the communities of George West (G), Odem (O), Sinton (S), and Taft (T) with an annual award of $250.000.

 

Continuing Education

The Continuing Education Division provides a multitude of courses for people of all ages, backgrounds, and needs: youngsters in KIDS’COLLEGE, adults in basic education classes, workforce retraining, industry specialization courses, and avocational classes.  These programs are constantly in flux due to audience need and industry demand; monitoring of all course offerings keeps them current and relevant.  There exists a strong liaison between the Continuing Education Division and service entities such as the Bee County Adult Literacy Council, the Texas Workforce Commission, the Oil & Gas Industry, the Coastal Bend College Foundation, and the Barnhart Foundation.  The division’s mission aptly complements that of the College:

It is the mission of the CBC Continuing Education Division to provide quality non-credit workforce and avocational educational opportunities. (CE Catalog) p. 3.

 

Kids’ College

Kids’ College is a summer educational program designed for children ages 6-12, and centers around a specific theme (“The Wonders of Egypt” for summer 2012) and incorporates “science, technology, engineering, and mathematics, as well as art, drama, and music” ). 

 

Online Courses

Classes designed for the general public are offered online and include such subject areas as drawing, digital photography, creating web pages, Microsoft programs, and SAT/ACT preparation.  A certificate of completion with a passing score is awarded for each of the six-week courses.

 

Adult Basic Education Program

The Coastal Bend College Adult Basic Education (ABE) Program provides instruction in reading, writing and mathematics to adults who are seeking to improve the basic skills necessary to function effectively in their personal and family lives, in the workplace, and in the community, and to improve literacy skills necessary for transitioning into the labor market or higher education. Classes are offered in basic skills, GED (high school equivalency diploma) preparation and English Language Learning for non-native speakers. Instruction is provided through classes or Distance Learning (Internet based); however, students enrolled in Distance Learning are still required to maintain a classroom presence.  A registration process must be completed before receiving services.

 

Basic skills classes are offered each year; English Language Learning classes are offered throughout the year.  Distance Learning is available all year through an Internet based program. Because demand for these services often exceeds the spaces we have available, CBC controls enrollment by maintaining a "waiting list" for entry into the program.  The College program receives funding from federal and state grant applications to provide FREE services, and services are based on the amount of funding received.  Applications will be processed in the order received and based on the availability of services.  Referrals from the Texas Workforce receive priority status.  CBC reserves the right to refuse services based on eligibility according to grant requirements and for past "failure to comply" with program requirements to maintain eligibility.

Application Process for Basic Skills Improvement Services

·         Adults age 18+ Submit application, schedule assessment and advising

·         Minors age 16-17 Submit application, schedule appointment with director and parent/guardian, schedule assessment, schedule advising with parent/guardian.

·         Minors age 16 are required to have a court order to enroll in ABE.

Application Process for English Language Services requires adults 18 years of age or older to submit an application, complete the assessment, and go through advising.

 

 

 

CBC CE “SEARCH

Seniors (S) Engaging (E) in Arts (A), Recreation (R), Culture (C), and Hyperspace (H) is a program for senior citizens that raise money for scholarships for CBC workforce continuing education students in conjunction with Collette Vacations.  Trips for 2012 include Italy, San Francisco & Lake Tahoe, and Alaska.

 

Customized Training

In today's ever-changing workforce, it's important for businesses and employees to be prepared for the challenges they'll face in their field. That’s why Customized Training at Coastal Bend College offers flexible training programs and consulting services to improve both individual careers and entire businesses. Individuals can get certified in a number of fields and take continuing education classes either on campus or online.

Companies can choose consultations or customized training sessions that will meet their particular objectives and needs. Sessions can take place on location or on campus at one of CBC's campuses throughout the Coastal Bend.

 

Small Business Customized Training

·         The Texas Workforce Commission (TWC) Skills for Small Business program responds to the needs of Texas' more than 433,000 small businesses that have fewer than 100 employees.

·         Training through Skills for Small Business increases business competitiveness, upgrades the skills of current employees and prepares newly hired employees for job requirements.

·         The program is in partnership with the Office of the Governor to further establish Texas as the premier place to support and expand the state's small businesses.

 

About Skills for Small Business targets businesses with fewer than 100 employees and provides:

·         Training for full-time employees;

·         Up to $1450 for tuition and fees per new hire;

·         Up to $725 for tuition and fees per incumbent employee;

·         Training selected from published course catalog - credit, continuing education, online or other available unpublished courses - offered by Coastal Bend College

·         Training may focus on occupations with the Governor's six Industry Clusters or emphasize local workforce development board targeted occupations.

Getting Started:

·         Small businesses identify training needs and training courses with the help of Coastal Bend College.

·         Businesses, with the assistance of Coastal Bend College, apply directly to TWC for training approval. TWC evaluates the applications and works with Coastal Bend College to fund the selected training.

·         Applications are available on the TWC Website, at Coastal Bend College, and from the local Workforce Development Board.

·         TWC project development specialists, as well as CBC CE Reps, are available to help complete applications and provide other assistance.

 

Petroleum Industries Training

From OSHA regulations and Spill Control to Emergency Response and CDL training, CBC continues to not only be responsive to the needs of the petroleum industry, but also looks for ways to remain ahead of the training curve. This includes the expansion of customized and continuing education courses from a full section of petroleum sector training to an Associate of Applied Science in Oil & Gas Technology that offers certification components as well.

 

Coastal Bend College’s Workforce & Customized Continuing Education Services for the Petroleum Industry is here to answer the needs of the industry.  In so doing CBC answers the mandate to improve the service area communities through education.  Employers get a more highly skilled workforce, workers have access to better paying jobs, and the economy is stimulated, proving once again that education works and works for everyone.

 

Top Gun 3-Day CDL Certification Course

Due to the vast and diverse profile of driver competency, this program addresses a multitude of issues in a timely manner and is intended to assess, build, and certify new employees with more than six months of Class A experience.  Excel Driver Services will prepare a driver physically and mentally for the challenges of operating a commercial vehicle under various conditions as identified in the oil field.  The course curriculum includes off-road instruction;  automated information system website that provides daily access to records (24 hour updates), flags key concerns and sends them to identified management via email for immediate feedback; examination on hours of service; compliance laws and rules of the road; hazard sources; solution-based driving system (refresher training); skills set (pre-trip evaluation, backing skills evaluation, road skills evaluation, mountain assessment); and final review.

 

Oil & Gas Exploration/Production Industrial Safety

Redip covers all necessary recertification classes for existing employees to meet OSHA and Company requirements.

 

 

Several other industry-specific training courses, such as those pertaining to drilling, safegulf/safeland, and oil-spill response are offered and can be reviewed through the CBC Continuing Education Catalog.

 

3.4.3    The institution publishes admissions policies consistent with its mission. (Admissions policies)   

_X__  Compliance           ___  Partial Compliance          ___  Non-Compliance

 

Narrative:   The admission policies of Coastal Bend College (CBC) are published in electronic format at the institution’s website; an overview of the admission requirements can be accessed also at this site.   These policies and procedures are mandated by Texas statute (Education Code Sec. 51.762, Sec. 130.0011, and Sec. 130.151) and are governed by regulations set forth by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (19 TAC 4.11, 19 TAC 4.261, and 19 TAC 5.5).  Coastal Bend College is an open-admissions institution which, by Texas law, means:

Sec. 130.151.  PURPOSE.  It is the purpose of this subchapter to enable each junior College which fulfills the provisions of this subchapter to provide useful and meaningful educational programs for any person 17 years of age or older with a high school diploma or its equivalent, or for any person 18 years of age regardless of prior educational experience, cultural background, or economic resources.

 

The admission requirement of submitting official transcripts from an accredited high school or a Certificate of High School Equivalency (GED) begins to appropriately identify applicants who have the ability to successfully complete a Coastal Bend College program.  As stated in the admission requirements, those “applicants who have neither high school diplomas nor equivalency certificates may be granted individual approval depending on the chosen program of study.”  College-level readiness is determined using placement test scores in accordance with the Texas Success Initiative.

 

Higher education admission standards are evaluated at every level of oversight: legislative statute through Texas Education Code Title III, Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board rules through the Texas Administrative Code, and College district policies through legal designations and local qualifiers of state laws and rules.  Amendments by these various agencies sustain relevance and currency in a changing educational environment, making admission standards as clear, reasonable, and consistently implemented as possible in order to meet the intent of Title 20 of the U.S. Department of Education.  The application process for admission to many Texas institutions of higher learning, including Coastal Bend College, has been simplified through the Common Admission Application Forms of 19 TAC 4.11. This form can be printed from the website, www.Collegeforalltexans.com, or in an electronic version at www.applytexas.com.  As stated in 19 TAC 4.11:

(b) Public junior Colleges, public state Colleges, and public technical institutes must accept freshman and undergraduate transfer applications using the electronic common admission application form. General academic teaching institutions must accept freshman and undergraduate transfer applications using either the electronic or printed format.

           

The CBC course catalog is published yearly in both hard copy and electronic formats.  The Student Handbook (p. 19-71) is contained within this publication, and provides information on admission procedures for all students (new, transfer, transient, former, home schooled, concurrent or dual credit high school, articulated high school credit, international, veteran, and non-degree seeking).  Some fields of study require background criminal checks and/or drug screening (Certified Nurse Aide, Vocational Nursing,  Registered Nursing, Early Development and Education, Dental Hygiene, Pharmacy Technician, Radiologic Technology), and some have more stringent admission requirements for acceptance into their respective programs.  The following table lists program admission information that is made available to prospective students.

Workforce Programs Admissions Information

Nursing Programs

         Certified Nurse Aide

         Licensed Vocational Nurse

         Registered Nurse

                                                                               website      NNAAP    

website      catalog  p. 112                                                                     website      catalog  p. 113                                                                           

Early Development and Education

website      catalog  p. 105

Dental Hygiene

website      catalog  p. 103   

Pharmacy Technician

website      catalog   p. 116 

Radiologic Technology

website      catalog   p. 118 

 

Consistent with College Mission

The Coastal Bend College’s published admission policies and procedures are consistent with the institution’s stated mission, and the goals of the College District are the means by which this mission is achieved.

Educational Role, Mission, Purpose, and Responsibility - AD (LOCAL)

“The College District is a comprehensive, public community College serving a diverse South Texas area. It is a student-centered institution committed to the highest integrity and to the development of an educational culture that supports creativity, encourages professional development, and promotes excellence in all areas”.

The goals of the College District shall be to:

1.     Provide technical/vocational programs leading to associate degrees or certificates;

2.     Provide postsecondary freshman and sophomore courses in arts and sciences that transfer to senior postsecondary institutions and that lead to associate degrees;

3.     Support local and statewide needs for occupational upgrading and workforce development through adult literacy, education, and retraining programs;

4.     Provide access to postsecondary education with an open admissions policy that includes developmental education programs;

5.     Enhance the learning environment by providing support services to meet the requirements of educational programs, faculty, and students;

6.     Maintain a campus conducive to learning; that is environmentally and functionally safe, accessible, attractive, and well-equipped;

8.    Provide counseling, educational advising, job placement and guidance programs to assist students in achieving their educational, personal, and career goals.

 

 The goals are comprehensive in scope as evidenced by the educational opportunities: adult literacy, technical/vocational programs, workforce retraining/upgrading, credit transferability to other Colleges and universities.  Public and inclusive are demonstrated through the open admission policy—all people have access to these educational and support services. 

 

3.4.4    The institution publishes policies that include criteria for evaluating, awarding, and accepting credit for transfer, experiential learning, credit by examination, advanced placement, and professional certificates that is consistent with its mission and ensures that course work and learning outcomes are at the collegiate level and comparable to the institution’s own degree programs.  The institution assumes responsibility for the academic quality of any course work or credit recorded on the institution’s transcript. (See the Commission policy “Collaborative Academic Arrangements: Policy and Procedures.”) Acceptance of academic credit)   Note: Although not listed as a reference in the Principles of Accreditation, see also the Commission policy “The Quality and Integrity of Undergraduate Degrees.”)

 

__X_  Compliance           ___  Partial Compliance          ___  Non-Compliance

 

Narrative: Coastal Bend College policies and accompanying criteria related to the evaluation, awarding, and accepting of credit for transfer, experiential learning, credit by examination, Advanced Placement, and professional certificates are published in the institution’s catalog in print and electronic versions (pages 21-26 and 41).

 

Credit for Transfer

Persons who have attended and earned credits and grades from other Colleges or vocational schools, and who wish to transfer these when applying to Coastal Bend College must submit official transcripts of the credits and grades and proof of good standing at the most recent school attended.  All official, original transcripts from accredited, non-accredited, and/or international schools, Colleges, or universities are evaluated by the Vice-President of Instruction & Economic & Workforce Development; Division Chairs of departments and faculty course directors may be consulted in the evaluation process.  In keeping with Texas Education Code Sec. 51.3521 (f), (2) and Texas Administrative Code Title 19, Rule 9.73, the College District Board implements policies on course transferability using both the Lower-Division Academic Course Guide Manual and the Guidelines for Instructional Programs in Workforce Education—approved publications of the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board.  Utilization of the Texas Common Course Numbering System (TCCNS) among participating institutions, of which Coastal Bend College is one, facilitates the evaluation and transfer of courses and grades from other TCCNS Colleges and schools.

 

International students must submit all official, original transcripts of grades and credits from the last four years of secondary school, as well as, official, original transcripts of grades and credits from any post-secondary schools, Colleges, or universities attended.  All transcripts must be translated into English and show good standing at the school most recently attended.  International students are subject to Texas Higher Education Assessment (THEA) requirements as are all Coastal Bend College students.

 

Credit for Experiential Learning and Professional Certificates

The American Council on Education’s Guide to the Evaluation of Educational Experience in the Armed Services (Guide) is used to determine if College credit can be awarded for completed military service school training.  Official documents from the particular branch of the armed services training school is reviewed and Coastal Bend College has in its curricula equivalent courses which the Guide recommends that credit be given, or if a recommended course can reasonably be counted as an elective in a given program.

 

Subject Competency Examinations may be given to students for College level credit.  Performance on the examinations must show competencies, either through academic preparation or experiences, which are equal to those ordinarily attained through completing a particular course.

 

Credit by Examination and Advanced Placement

 

Coastal Bend College accepts passing scores on certain examinations—College Board Advanced Placement (AP), College Level Examination Program (CLEP), Defense Activity for Non-Traditional Educational Support (DANTES), and CBC Subject Competency Examination—that allow students to earn credit for some courses, up to a maximum of 18 semester hours.  A CLEP list of courses and an AP list of courses are included in the College catalog, page 25 and page 26 respectively.  The catalog provides an overview of testing criteria; students interested in earning credit by examination should meet with College staff/faculty and Division Chairs for more information and direction.

 

Consistent with College Mission

Coastal Bend College’s policies related to the transfer of College credit or the awarding of credit for College level learning through experience or by examinations are consistent with its mission of student-centeredness and the promotion of educational/professional excellence.  Credit transferability is included in the goals of the College District; this inclusion demonstrates the importance that earned College credit has on the future of Coastal Bend College students.

 

At Collegiate Level and Comparable to Institution’s Own Degree Programs

Coastal Bend College is governed through statutes by the Texas legislature, rules by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, local policies by the College District Board of Trustees, and accreditation standards of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, Commission on Colleges.  All laws, rules, regulations, policies, and standards set by these regulatory entities must be implemented in order for the institution to maintain full accreditation status.  Submission of course work for College credit from Colleges or universities beyond the regulatory umbrella of the above agencies/boards is scrutinized by the institution’s faculty, division chairs, and Dean of Instructional Services to ensure that all transfer credit is at College-level proficiency.

 

Assumption of Academic Responsibility

Coastal Bend College assumes responsibility for the academic quality of all transfer credit that appears on the institution’s transcripts.  To ensure that the transfer and awarding of credit from other Colleges, schools, universities, or by examination is at the College level and is comparable to courses and programs within the institution, all evaluation mechanisms are used—Lower-Division Academic Course Guide Manual, the Guidelines for Instructional Programs in Workforce Education, evaluation of translated international transcripts, and examination scores.  Faculty, division chairs, and Dean of Instructional Services are involved in the transfer-of-credit evaluation process.  This academic responsibility is integral to the institution’s professional integrity.

3.4.5    The institution publishes academic policies that adhere to principles of good educational practice.  These policies are disseminated to students, faculty, and other interested parties through publications that accurately represent the programs and services of the institution. (Academic policies)

 

__X_  Compliance           ___  Partial Compliance          ___  Non-Compliance

 

Narrative:   Coastal Bend College’s academic policies adhere to good educational practices.  These polices are the result of Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board mandates, state statutes, specific program needs, and the College’s mission and vision statement.  CBC does and continues to offer quality online degrees to meet the needs of the working population in the surrounding area.  EFAB (LEGAL); EE (LOCAL)p. 1.

Academic policies include, but are not limited to, administrative, curriculum, programs (subject matter), methods of instructions, and any other matters related to instruction, delivery, and student outcomes.   Academic Policies are specific to our mission and student needs.  The College District continually reappraises educational programs to assure that the courses offered meet the specific needs of the community and the students.  This includes the areas of workforce, continuing education, dual-credit programs, and academic programs.  (EFAB (LEGAL) p. 2; [EE(LOCAL)p.1)) Coastal Bend College adheres to the Coordinating Board’s recommended core curriculum of at least 42 semester credit hours. [EFAA (LEGAL), p. 1]  The core curriculum is reviewed and evaluated every 10 years, and according to the Education Code 61.824 each College must review and evaluate its procedures for complying with the field of study curricula at intervals specified by the coordinating board. [EFAA (LEGAL) p.9]

 

The College president and vice-presidents authorize and establish procedures for curriculum development.  Academic policy changes can be initiated by any faculty member who then presents the change to the division chair. Faculty and division chairs will develop and or revise curriculum.  Division Chair(s) then present the recommendations to the Vice-President of Instruction and Economic and Workforce Development.  Prior to approval, these changes will be reviewed by the curriculum and catalog committee.  Any changes, if approved, will then be implemented [EE (LOCAL) p. 1].

Example:  The Chair of Preparatory Studies began the process of a curriculum change after attending the Developmental Education Initiative (DEI) “Kick Off”.  The Chair met with other representatives from other Colleges to get ideas for strategies.  Other DEI College representatives were contacted to compile the most recent data on the institutions initiatives that CBC was interested in initializing and hired consultants who had backgrounds in these specific strategy areas.  Workshops and meetings with instructors, staff, counselors, advisors, and administrators were held to target the best strategies for CBC.  CBC’s DEI Core Team met to discuss the logistics of initializing these strategies at the institution.  The completed initiatives where then submitted to the President’s Cabinet and Faculty Association for review. The DEI Core Team met to review the current TSI Plan and insert the institutional changes.  This revised Texas Success Initiative Developmental Education Plan went through various readings and revisions.  In 2010 the revised plan was brought before the CBC College Board of Trustees for approval.  It was approved as part of the Board meeting of June 24, 2010(p.4, Item 6I).

 

3.4.6    The institution employs sound and acceptable practices for determining the amount and level of credit awarded for courses, regardless of format or mode of delivery. (Practices for awarding credit)

 

__X_  Compliance           ___  Partial Compliance          ___  Non-Compliance

 

Narrative: Coastal Bend College awards credit for courses according to the guidelines of the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board’s (Coordinating Board) Lower-Division Academic Course Guide Manual (ACGM)and the Guidelines for Instructional Programs in Workforce Education (GIPWE) manual which provides regulations set forth by the state of Texas on credit, non-credit, and non-transfer courses provided by the College.

 

The Coastal Bend College Board of Trustees submits annually to the Coordinating Board a comprehensive list of all courses with a description of the content, scope, and prerequisites of all courses offered for that academic year. Changes are submitted on dates designated by the Coordinating Board. Contact hours for career technical/workforce continuing education courses are determined and reported in compliance with the policy outlined in GIPWE as approved by the Coordinating Board.

 

CBC awards credit for courses delivered face-to-face, online, by video conferencing, and through hybrid delivery using the semester credit hour (SCHs) system or continuing Education Units (CEUs).  The CBC Catalog (page 122-148) provides a brief description of each course that is offered, the number of credit hours, and number of contact hours which follow the guidelines set forth in the Lower-Division Academic Course Guide Manual and Guidelines for Instructional Programs in Workforce Education Manual.

 

Academic courses are traditionally delivered within a 15-week instruction period totaling 45 contact hours, plus a week for final exams bringing the total of contact hours to 48 hours if there is a final. Courses delivered in shortened semester should have the 45 contact hours unless it has been reviewed and approved through a formal institutional faculty review process as stated in Policy EFA (LEGAL).

 

Coastal Bend College follows the state regulations for workforce programs provided in the Guidelines for Instructional Programs in Workforce Education as outlined in EFAB (LEGAL). Contact hours for career technical/workforce education courses can result in either SCHs or CEUs.  A course or program that meets or exceeds 360 hours in length must be approved except by special justification and approval of Board staff.  A course or program that meets or exceeds 780 hours in length must result in the award of appropriate semester credit hours and be applicable to a certificate and an applied associated degree program.

 

All courses offered through CBC maintain the same standards regardless of the manner of delivery. Face-to-face, online, hybrid, and video conferencing courses maintain an equivalent to face-to-face courses.  All faculty members who teach online/hybrid /video conferencing courses must maintain a virtual instructional certificate. This certificate must be current prior to any online delivery.  Instructors are required to submit a self-course review prior to launching to a live audience.  This document is reviewed by the Division Chair for content and the LMS Coordinator for design and delivery, and is then approved by the Dean of Instructional Services (which will now be the Dean of Academics or the Dean of Workforce and Economic Development).

 

3.4.7    The institution ensures the quality of educational programs/courses offered through consortia relationships or contractual agreements, ensures ongoing compliance with the Principles, and periodically evaluates the consortial relationship and/or agreement against the mission of the institution. (See the Commission policy “Collaborative Academic Arrangements.”)  (Consortia relationships/contractual agreements)

___  Compliance           ___  Partial Compliance          ___  Non-Compliance

 

Narrative:  DOES NOT APPLY – NO CONSORTIAL RELATIONSHIPS FOR EDUCATIONAL

PROGRAMS EXIST AT COASTAL BEND COLLEGE.

 

3.4.8    The institution awards academic credit for course work taken on a noncredit basis only when there is documentation that the noncredit course work is equivalent to a designated credit experience. (Noncredit to credit) 

_X__  Compliance           ___  Partial Compliance          ___  Non-Compliance

 

Narrative:  Basic adult education programs shall be provided by the College District in accordance with state statute and the regulations and standards formulated by the State Board of Education, and all Career Technical/Workforce continuing education courses shall meet the guidelines outlined in the Guidelines for Instructional Programs in Workforce Education as approved by the Coordinating Board and WECM as authorized by policy EFCB (LEGAL). 

 

Coastal Bend College awards academic credit for course work taken as continuing education mirror courses with approval.  This was formerly the responsibility of the Dean of Instructional Services; however, due to the new organization of the College administration, this is the responsibility of the Vice-President of Instruction and Economic and Workforce Development.

 

It is the responsibility of the College to document that coursework is equivalent to collegiate coursework, that all student competencies are met, and that the coursework was taught by a qualified instructor.  When a course can be delivered for semester credit hours and continuing education hours, it is defined as a mirror course and must be offered as published in the Workforce Education Course Manual.  Coastal Bend College is responsible for meeting the requirements of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, Commission on Colleges. Courses earning CEUs are subject to the SACS-COC guidelines and must be approved by the established procedures of the Coordinating Board.  These programs shall be provided by the College District in accordance with state statute and the regulations and standards formulated by the State Board of Education (Education Code 29.253).

 

For the transfer of a non-credit status to credit hours being awarded to a student, he/she must have met the course requirements imposed on the students who took the course for credit hours.  The CBC Catalog page 150, lists the following guidelines required for a continuing education course to be converted to a credit course.

  1. A formal application for conversion must be made to the Vice-President of Instruction and Economic and Workforce Development. 
  2. The student must pass a competency exam in each specific subject area and must pay a $25 conversion fee for each class.   
  3. Students must follow regular credit course registration; however, space availability is totally dependent upon the number of credit students enrolled. 

Military Training

Coastal Bend College grants credit for service schools completed by military and retired military personnel in accordance with the American Council on Education’s Guide to the Evaluation of Educational Experience in the Armed Services, provided students follow specific guidelines.  Any official military record that describes the training completed, verifies successful completion of such training, and satisfies the purpose of the course for which the student is seeking credit will be considered when determining whether to award course credit toward a degree offered by Coastal Bend College.  The College can award additional course credit (when considered appropriate) for a student’s military service as stated in policy EGA (LEGAL).  The College Catalog page 41 lists the guidelines required for those seeking to receive credit for military training.

1.    The student is officially enrolled at CBC

2.    The student furnishes official documents indicating satisfactory completion of service schools for which credit at CBC is requested

3.    CBC has in its curricula equivalent courses for which the guide recommends that credit be given or if a recommended course can reasonably be counted as an elective in a given program. 

The nursing student in the example received transcripted semester credit hours for military training toward an AAS Degree (RN Program). The Vice-President of Instruction and Economic and Workforce Development has approved the awarding of credit for BIOL 2401 for his previous military training.  The student has an Anatomy and Physiology course (2 SCH) and another Anatomy and Physiology course (4 SCH).  Two (2) Anatomy and Physiology courses (total of 6 SCH) is equivalent to BIOL 2401 (4SCH). 

 

3.4.9    The institution provides appropriate academic support services. (Academic support services) 

_X__  Compliance           ___  Partial Compliance          ___  Non-Compliance

 

Narrative: Coastal Bend College (CBC) provides appropriate academic support services in a variety of formats for both students and faculty.  The purpose of these services is anchored in CBC’s “student-centered” institutional mission.  Support services are geared to “promote excellence” by enhancing instruction, by contributing to the attainment of student learning outcomes, and by ensuring the success of students and faculty in meeting their educational goals. Services include recruitment and outreach activities, testing, academic advising, counseling, tutoring, career planning, student orientations, student activities, libraries, special needs services, a help desk, and Student Success Centers. Information on the College’s various support services is available in the College Catalog, the Student Handbook, the Student Activity Calendar, on the webpage, and in the Forum, the College newsmagazine. Students are also emailed information on services and upcoming events in an appropriate and timely manner.

 

Academic Advising Services 

Coastal Bend College values the importance of academic advising to student success and completion.  Academic advisors assist students by assisting with admission and testing processes, explaining testing requirements and results, helping set College and career goals, assisting with registration and the selection of class schedules, providing special needs and disability services, providing opportunities to explore career, degree and certification options, establishing degree plans, identifying or assisting in the changing of a student’s major, helping with financial aid or suspension appeals, improving academic standing through targeted advising, providing intrusive advising by checking on student progress throughout the semester, reviewing graduation requirements and providing four-year transfer assistance.

Coastal Bend College uses the Degree Audit Reporting System. This system provides the student and advisor a computer generated analysis of degree requirements for a particular degree, major, minor, or concentration. The audit is a valuable tool for academic planning and course selection, because it matches the courses that the student has taken with the requirements of his/her degree program or anticipated program. The degree monitors the student’s progress towards a degree and/or allows him or her to consider other degrees as options by matching coursework with the requirements for those degrees. Students log on to Degree Audit through their Campus Connect account.

 

Coastal Bend College offers various opportunities for student advising:

·         Student Services Advisors: Advisors are located in the campus counseling offices at each site. Students direct initial questions to these advisors. Based on test placement scores or a review of transfer work, these advisors will discuss career options and degree and/or certificate requirements with students prior to referring them to the appropriate program/department’s faculty advisor. Students who are undeclared are provided extensive academic and career information and access to resources to assist them in making informed choices.  For students who plan on transferring academic advising is provided to assure a smooth transition to their school of choice.

·         Faculty Advisors: Students who are declared majors are advised by appropriate faculty members in their disciplines. Faculty maintains regular office hours, encourage regular class attendance and study habits, help students analyze and resolve difficulties, and help students develop confidence and independence.  Faculty members provide academic advising and assist in the registration process for students with declared majors in their respective disciplines.  Additional services provided include: degree planning; declared major/career advising; mentoring; providing references for scholarships, employment, and academic program application; student club/organization sponsorship; and participation in study socials and organized student activities.

·         Veterans’ Advisors: Advisors located in the student counseling office are trained to work with students and their families who have or are serving in our military forces. A Veterans’ Affairs Specialist is also available to assist with specific concerns.

·         Special Needs Counselors: Each campus provides access to a Special Needs Counselor. Self-identified students who provide acceptable documentation of disability are provided various accommodations including extended test times, the use of textbooks designed for their needs, etc.  Coastal Bend College adheres to and appreciates federal laws pertaining to individuals with disabilities when assessing and advising students.

 

According to the Community College Survey of Student Engagement (CCSSE) 2012, Item 13.2C, of the students to whom the question was applicable, 91.8 % of them were very (40.9%) or somewhat (50.9%) satisfied with the College’s academic advising.  CBC’s satisfaction rates with this service were higher when compared to small Colleges (89.9%) or the CCSSE 2012 cohort of all Colleges surveyed (87.2%).

 

Coastal Bend College Library System

CBC’s Library System serves both student and academic support roles at all sites and online.

The libraries serve a primarily academic support role as described in detail in sections 3.8.1 and 3.8.3. See those sections for a description of our resources and services. For evidence of the library’s role in providing training on how to efficiently and effectively use our resources, see section 3.8.2.  Library staff teaches on-campus and distance students and faculty how to successfully utilize resources.  They provide up-to-date, peer-reviewed information that is accessible 24/7 from any computer or mobile device.

 

The College’s library system promotes student engagement by regularly hosting workshops, movie nights, club events and other social activities for students, faculty, and staff.  Examples of these include convocation receptions; study cram sessions, and annual Phi Theta Kappa honor ceremonies since 2007. Librarians have served as club sponsors (HALO Club and Phi Theta Kappa). The main library hosts ten club events per year including the Phi Theta Kappa honors dinner.  In addition, it hosts CRAM sessions provided by Student Services every semester. CBC tutors meet regularly with students in the library facilities at all sites and provide food licensing classes and testing annually to support fundraising in both the College and in the communities served by CBC. 

 

The library system also supports student success and student retention since students need diverse, peer-reviewed resources in all formats covering all programs offered by the College in order to pass classes and achieve their educational goals. The library provides study rooms or areas for individual and group study, access to equipment to introduce students to technology being used currently (20 laptops, 1 IPAD, and 2 APEX machines are available during open hours for in-house use), and tutors utilize facilities to meet regularly with students at every site. Displays are thought provoking and informative.  Library staff regularly participates in student service recruiting and achievement events such as Passport Day, CBC Rocks, and student award assemblies which promote student success. Since 2005, Phi Theta Kappa, the academic honors organization, uses one of the lobby display areas in Beeville to promote their services.

 

To view circulation data for the laptops and other library resources, see Appendix IV, V, and VI.  Appendix VII shows where students are when accessing the catalog, online resources, research videos and tutorials, and what types of devices they use to access information. The library is student-centered. Staff strives to excel in the quality and quantity of resources so that faculty seeking additional degrees can also utilize this information. Evidence that patrons utilize resources can be seen Annual Circulation Report which shows 31,244 circulations in the 2011-2012. To equalize services to distance students, the library developed an online tutorial and test which is placed on BlackBoard to further enhance the student learning experience at CBC. Professional librarians are available to students via phone, email, text and via email after hours during hours shown to have the highest usage of our online resources.

 

The library prides itself as a place where students’ academic and social lives can merge. Library facilities provide comfortable seating areas allowing for group or individual work areas. Students can multitask allowing for groups or individuals to use computers or laptops to access resources, email or games. This environment promotes student learning, engagement, and development.

 Career Development

Staff assists students and alumni with job information, job assistance, and career guidance.  They help students identify careers best suited to their personalities and interests by administering free online as­sessments like MyPlan. During a students’ CBC tenure, a variety of career development workshops and special events are offered. These include workshops on building resumes and cover letters, on improving job interviewing skills, and on determining appropriate workplace attire.  Skills are honed through mock job interviews. Etiquette dinners provide tips on making a good impression through proper dining skills. Workshops and events are offered both outside and inside of the classroom. CBC students and alumni who need assistance in finding full or part-time employment are encour­aged to meet with the Career Development Advisor and to set up a student account via the free, online Coastal Bend College Online Career Center. Creating an account with CBC Works will enable students to upload a resume and other job search tools, as well as connect with prospective employers. An annual city-wide career fair is held annually at the Beeville site to assist students with their job search process. Students are also provided one-on-one career guidance. Information on the events and services provided by this office is disseminated to the faculty and staff through its website, campus e-mail, a Student Activity Calendar and flyers. According to the Community College Survey of Student Engagement (CCSSE) 2012, Item, 13.2b, of the students to whom the question was applicable, 85% of them were very (45.5%) or somewhat (39.5%) satisfied with the College’s career counseling.  CBC’s satisfaction rates with this service were higher when compared to small Colleges (77.7%) or the CCSSE 2012 cohort of all Colleges surveyed (77.6%).  Also, as per the (CCSSE) 2012, Item 13.2c, of the students to whom the question was applicable, 67.2% of them were very (23.9%) or somewhat (43.3%) satisfied with the College’s job placement assistance.  CBC’s satisfaction rates with this service were higher when compared to small Colleges (64.3%) or the CCSSE 2012 cohort of all Colleges surveyed (62%). 

 

New Student Orientation

New student orientations are offered at all sites at various times and online to assist entering students in building a solid foundation for success. Orientations ease the College transition by providing information to students and family members on areas including registration procedures, College routines, rights and responsibilities, College information systems, financial aid, student services, and tips for succeeding in College. On-site tours familiarize students with the campus and introduce them to key offices. During face-to face “Cougar Day” orientations in the summer leading to the fall semester, students are urged to complete an admissions form online and report entrance testing results to the Admissions/Registrar’s Office prior to orientation so they may register during the event.  Three hundred and seven students and 163 guests attended Cougar Days 2012  New student orientation workshops are also offered early during the fall and spring semesters at all CBC campuses in the form of workshops, and the online orientation is also available from the “Student Services” menu on the CBC website.

 

Online Learning Student Resources

CBC students are provided with numerous online resources. These may be accessed from the Distance Learning link and the Online Resources links on the CBC website.  They include:

 

  • A student email so students can stay connected;
  • A list of various downloads from Internet Browsers to free plug-ins such as Acrobat Reader and Java;
  • Various ways to communicate with technical support staff including email, toll-free phone support, and online chat;
  • A help desk, available via phone, email, and live chat, provides students assistance with online courses, Campus Connect, BlackBoard, and other needs particular to online services;
  • An online orientation so students can learn about CBC services, policies and practices;
  • A distance learning internet orientation covering various topics including internet test policies, Campus Connect, student email, and library resources;
  • An orientation is also offered as students login in to Blackboard so they learn how to use the course menu to navigate through the different units though online tutorials which contains short videos on how to use CBC’s course management system, Campus Connect, student email and various tutorial services;
  • Access to Campus Connect so students can view grades, pay tuition, buy books, view financial aid, print unofficial transcript, and update contact information;
  • A link to access CBC online bookstore;
  • Online access to Health 101 , a magazine to help student maintain healthy lifestyles; CashCourse,  a financial literacy resource to help student make smart financial choices; Transfer 101 , a website dedicated to helping students transfer to four year universities; MyPlan  a program designed to help choose a major and a career; and to online workshops  on topics such as time management and study skills;
  • An online chat option available from the website and linked to key student assistance offices like counseling, financial aid and admissions.

 

1.    Wireless internet access is provided at all sites with over 12,000 users including over 100 guest accounts.  The service is accessed by approximately 120 users during peak times. 

 

Recruitment and Outreach Activities

Numerous recruitment and outreach activities are designed to provide new students with the information they need to make good academic choices and to ease their transition into CBC.  Students learn about admission requirements to the College and to special programs, tuition and housing costs and CBC policies and procedures.  They are provided assistance with the admissions, financial aid and housing applications Recruiters participate in numerous activities to recruit new students including providing informational presentations at “College Day” events at local high schools. They host campus visits for individual high schools and students.  A large multi-high school, on-campus, event called “CBC Rocks” is held in Beeville annually.  In March 2012, 371 students attended from 10 different schools.  Staff also participates at community events geared to provide awareness of the College and its offerings, and each site also hosts an annual community event to introduce the community to the College’s services.  CBC recruiters attend and host Texas Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers events annually.  In September 2012, seven area schools and approximately 510 students participated.  In 2011-2012, approximately 10,198 students were served through 185 recruitment events.

Other recruitment and/or outreach activity is provided through the following special programs.

  • The Texas Afterschool Center on Education (ACE) program is a federally funded 21st century grant for which CBC is subcontracted to Beeville Independent School District (BISD).  CBC provides dual credit and concurrent enrollment in both academic and workforce education courses to BISD high school students. Academic support services include academic and career counseling, mentoring, admissions assistance, tutoring, parental involvement, payment of course fees and books, and enrollment in EDUC 1300 (a Student Success Course).
  • The CBC Beeville campus hosts an annual Passport Program designed to increase awareness of sophomore students during their spring semester of dual credit opportunities as they prepare to make educational decisions for their junior year of high school.  Campus staff, faculty, and community stakeholders come together in a day-long program that informs and encourages local high school students to enroll in dual credit courses at CBC. In addition to educating students about the various courses available to them through the dual credit program, Passport also helps to educate high school students about the different processes involved in College admissions and exposes them to a day in the life of a College student. Initiated in 2008, the number of students attending has increased annually to 217 in 2012.

 

Counseling and Advising

CBC’s professional counselors and advisors in the Counseling and Advising Offices at each site help students derive the full benefits from their College experience. They give special attention to students needing assistance with educational, personal, developmental, social, and career issues in a safe, confidential and helpful atmosphere. Staff teaches strategies which help students learn to solve problems, make decisions, change behaviors and accept responsibilities. They help minimize educational obstacles while maximizing personal and scholastic success.  They provide a wide range of services to help students in planning College and career goals, identifying or changing a major, explaining testing requirements and results, assisting with registration and advising processes, selecting class schedules, providing special needs and disability services, establishing degree plans, preparing financial aid or suspension appeals, improving academic standing, providing intrusive advising by monitoring progress; providing transfer assistance, hosting recruitment events, providing personal counseling and referrals, providing career and job placement services, and offering online and face to face workshops and special events designed for student success. Online and face to face workshops include topics such as communication skills, financial aid opportunities, study skills, time management, test anxiety, stress management, learning styles, plagiarism, resume writing, financial literacy, mental health issues, etc. A list of scheduled events including face to face workshops is available on the CBC website on a Student Activity Calendar  link, and students are also notified by email and/or through phone calls routinely of upcoming events and deadlines.   Each year more than 12,000 students (duplicated headcount) are served in the Counseling and Advising Offices.  Face-to-face and online events are evaluated and data  is gathered for improvement. Staff contact information and an online chat option is available via the website

Testing Centers

The Testing Centers at each site provide numerous testing services to meet students’ individual needs. The Centers are open as needed by site for extended hours to accommodate a wide range of schedules. Exams are administered in a secure, proctored testing environment. Testing services include the administration of tests for web-based courses, make-up exams, correspondence exams, and standardized exams such as ACT, ACCUPLACER, GED, and SAT. In 2011, CBC administered 2410 ACUPLACER exams; 5,160 internet, make-up, correspondence and special accommodation exams; and 401 individual GED exams. As of October 2010, it became mandatory for all first-time Coastal Bend College students to complete a free, 4-hour, Texas Success Initiative (TSI) Developmental Education Program (DEP) preparation session before they are eligible to take the ACCUPLACER exam. The Testing Center provides this service to give prospective students opportunities to refresh themselves in reading, writing, math and the test format prior to taking the exam.

 

Special Needs Services

CBC is committed to providing equal opportunities for students with learning and/or physical disabilities. Information on how to self-identify is explained at orientations and in the catalog and student handbook.  Faculty is provided a handbook and information on special need accommodations and requirements at workshops. They are asked to include the following statement in their syllabi: “Students with special needs, including physical and learning disabilities, who wish to request accommodations in this class, should contact the Counseling Office as soon as possible to make arrangements.  In accordance with federal law, a student requesting accommodations must provide documentation of disability to the Special Needs Counselor.  For more information, please go by the Counseling Office, or contact: (list of counselors by site provided)”.  Counselors and advisors help students with disabilities participate fully by assisting with students’ individual career, academic, and personal counseling needs.  Special needs students receive orientation, admissions and registration assistance unique to their requirements.  Students provide documentation as to their unique situation and needs.  Services are prescribed based on recommendations from their documentation’s evaluating specialist, the student, the instructor, and the counselor/advisor.  Services include the use of specialized learning equipment, note takers, peer tutoring, interpreter services, referral services, and special parking provisions as needed.  The College collaborates with agencies such as the Department of Assistive and Rehabilitation Services, the Texas Commission for the Blind, and the Corpus Christi Area Council for the Deaf, Inc. to assist students with their needs. In 2011-12, fifty-four (unduplicated) special needs students were served. According to the CCSSE 2012, Item 13.2k, of the students to whom the question was applicable, 73.9% of them were very (35.9%) or somewhat (38%) satisfied with the College’s services to students with disabilities.  CBC’s satisfaction rates with this service were higher when compared to small Colleges (72.4%) or the CCSSE 2012 cohort of all Colleges surveyed (70.8%).

 

Student Activities and Organizations

CBC offers numerous student-focused programs and services designed to enhance students’ educational development and retention . To promote awareness, students are provided an activity calendar each fall and spring listing scheduled activities by campus. The calendars are also maintained and updated online.  Activities and programs include NJCAA athletic events, intramural programs, informative workshops on student issues, new student orientation, student recognition opportunities, social events, cultural programs, etc.  Retention data illustrates that on 2011-12, in 148 events, over 6,000 duplicated students were served. Events are evaluated and data is gathered for improvement. The majority of services are deemed satisfactory or better by participants. 

 

CBC is proud of its association with the National Junior College Athletic Association (NJCAA) Division I program. Approximately, seventy-five athletes compete in CBC Athletics including women’s softball and volleyball, and men’s basketball and soccer.   Students are provided free admission to athletic events.  Athletes provide service to the community and the community supports their endeavors.  Partnerships exist with the City of Beeville to use facilities and collaborative efforts result in better resources for both.

 

In 2011-12, CBC hosted 14 student organizations throughout its four sites. Student organizations included representation from criminal justice, Spanish, cosmetology, religious groups, powerlifting, biology, nursing, welding, and early childhood educators.  Each organiza­tion has a faculty advisor, student officers, and a defined mission, and a club constitution.  Over 230 students participated in 2011-12.  Organizations provide campus and community services and some conduct fundraisers to fund educational outings.  Phi Theta Kappa, for example, sponsors an average of five blood drives a year, adopts a highway, assists with College activities like CBC Rocks, and attends state conventions and leadership conferences.  The Radiology Club raises funds to sponsor student participation in the annual Radiologic Student Educator Seminars and Conferences.  With the exception of certain honorary societies, clubs and orga­nizations are open for membership to any CBC student. Students may also start a new organization by contacting the Student Activity Coordinator. CBC encourages the formation of student organizations by providing a stipend for advisors and annual funds of $400.  Phi Theta Kappa and the Student Government Association receive funding for training and travel.  According to the Community College Survey of Student Engagement (CCSSE) 2012, Item 13.2i, of the students to whom the question was applicable, 74.9% of them were very (24.5%) or somewhat (50.4%) satisfied with the College’s student organizations. 

 

All students may also attend a series of cultural events offered at the Beeville site by the Visual Arts Department   and the Coastal Bend Community Performing Arts Project sponsored by CBC, the Beeville Concert Association and the Beeville Community Chorus.  Most are free.

 

Faculty Resource Room for Distance Education

The Faculty Resource Room for Distance Education is equipped with five (5) high-powered computers.  These computers have specific software installed which includes programs such as Adobe Acrobat, Captivate, Photoshop, Premiere, Dreamweaver, Audacity, Camtasia Studio, Microsoft Office Suite, Respondus, SnagIt, and Soft Chalk.  These programs are used by faculty as needed to produce content for their online classes.  The computers are setup in a lab setting with an instructor computer for small, hands-on training sessions for faculty to attend, or simply for faculty to come in and use at their convenience.  Distance Education provides a video recording studio with a green screen for faculty to use to create video recordings of Instructor introductions to pre-recorded lectures.  We also provide USB headsets, webcams, digital cameras, and bloggies for faculty to check out and use as needed.  In addition to the hardware and software needed to develop online classes, we also provide faculty training and support for Blackboard, Campus Connect, Employee Email, and Ektron, CBC’s webpages.

 

Computer Labs

The College provides numerous computer labs for instruction and for student use at each site. 

 

Tutoring 

Tutorial services are provided free at each CBC campus and online to students who need assistance or who want to improve academic skills.

·         Student Success Center (SSC) Tutoring:  The SSCs at all sites offer both professional and peer student tutoring in various modalities including one-on-one, group, by appointment and drop-in.  Free food and door prizes are provided as tutors and instructors help students through Study Socials and Cram Sessions. During 2011-12, approximately 267 students used the service college-wide.  Academic workshops (both on site and online) on topics like “How to Write a Research Paper” are provided throughout the year and are open to all students.  Other information on College survival tips are provided through handouts and in study groups. During 2011-12, approximately 267 students used the service.

  • Northeast eTutoring:  eTutoring, a free online professional tutorial service, is available seven day a week from the early morning to late evening hours for all CBC students in areas including accounting, anatomy and physiology, biology, chemistry, physics, math (developmental through calculus), medical coding, Spanish, statistics, and web development.  eChat allows students to meet one-on-one with a tutor via a fully interactive, virtual environment. An Online Writing Lab provides feedback within 24-48 hours to students who submit writing drafts.
  • Other tutoring services are provided through programs like the federally-funded TRiO Programs, Project Oasis, a Title III HIS Stem Program, and a Title V Celebrando Educacion grant.  These are described in greater detail further in this section.  Through The Title V grant the College will provide Supplemental Instruction in spring 2013.

 

Student Success Centers (SSC)

Student Success Centers at each site provide resources and services designed to augment learning and to ensure retention. They house the tutoring and testing departments; host workshops and computer labs, and provide laptop and calculator loan-outs and free printing. SSC Coordinators, located on the Beeville and Kingsville campuses, provide case management and academic tracking of students enrolled in SSC’s services and other identified at-risk students. Staff collects data on student activity to monitor the Center’s effectiveness.

 

Project OASIS

Federally funded under the Department of Education’s Title III HSI STEM and Articulation Program, Project OASIS (Optimizing Academic Success in the Sciences) has increased science student support staff by adding case managers in Alice and Kingsville and a Science Learning Skills Specialist in Alice and Kingsville.

Staff understanding that advising is teaching use an Advising Syllabus to help science students understand policy and procedures, the Blackboard platform, Campus Connect, email, core curriculum requirements, grade point averages; degree requirements for transfer or graduation, and the online catalog. Case managers also serve as early alert and retention specialists monitoring student progress and following up on student referrals from faculty.  Utilizing the ZOGOTECH Estudias Program, they identify at-risk students as they register for science classes and take a proactive approach in working with them.  The Learning Skills Specialist will assist students through tutoring, mini- courses in study skills, science topics, and science careers, and will advise students with course scheduling, degree plans, and problem resolution relating to the science curriculum.  Beginning in spring 2013, OASIS began providing tutoring and supplemental instruction services to students in science courses that have consistently had D, W, and F grade rates of 30% or higher.  Fall 2009 D, W, F rates are the baseline for measuring improvement of student success that will result from supplemental instruction, tutoring, and redesign of the “gatekeeper” science courses Targets have been set for improvement in course success rates (A, B, C) by the completion of the grant period which ends September 2016. Higher target rates indicate those courses that are being redesigned first and offered more semesters in a redesigned format during the grant period.

 

Federal TRiO Programs

The Federal TRiO Programs are outreach and student services programs designed to identify and provide services for low-income and/or first-generation individuals and/or individuals with disabilities to progress through the academic pipeline from middle school to post-baccalaureate programs. They provide individualized assistance in the development of personal, academic, career, and professional goals. Services include tutoring, advising, scholarship and financial aid assistance, educational and counseling services, financial literacy information, career counseling, and exposure to cultural events and academic programs.  CBC has hosted a Student Support Services Program which serves 215 CBC students since 1971 at the Beeville campus.  It hosts two Educational Talent Search Programs serving a total of 1,287 students with one in Beeville since 1976 and the on the in Alice since 2006. Its two Upward Bound Programs are hosted in Beeville and serve a total of 135 target area high school students with one originating in 1973 and the second in 2007. The TRiO Program are assessed annually by means of the Annual Performance Report required of all TRiO Programs by the U.S. Department of Education. CBC’s TRiO Programs consistently meet or exceed the annual goals developed in conjunction with the Department of Education. Based on the internal satisfaction surveys distributed to students, 100 percent of the students surveyed indicated that they are 95% satisfied with the services offered through the TRiO Program. 

Title V Celebrando Educación

Coastal Bend College partners with Del Mar College in implementing  Celebrando Educación, a Title V grant from the United States Department of Education: Developing Hispanic-Serving Institutions Program.  The grant focuses on improving colleges' retention and completion rates and increasing enrollment in technical and/or professional occupational fields of study.  The grant provides intensive tutoring services by offering lab manned tutoring services, online tutorial services and Supplemental Instruction (SI), an academic assistance program that utilizes peer-assisted study sessions.  Through SI, students learn how to integrate course content and study skills while working together.  The sessions are facilitated by “SI leaders”, students who have previously done well in the course.  Student Success Center Coordinators do enhanced case management advising in the Beeville and Kingsville campuses for all sites. Providing a wide range of resources, Student Success Centers have been added at all sites.  Centers are equipped with new furniture designed to increase learning opportunities and supplies including laptops and calculators available for student checkout.  All sites have access to a mobile computer lab for faculty classroom use.  Additionally, the grant provided for Zogotech, an early alert program that will be used at all sites in the Fall of 2013 to provide faculty and support staff the opportunity to provide intervention services to students who may be experiencing difficulty in class. The College also provides outreach to service area school districts by offering bridging programs for dual enrollment students.  Intervention strategies, including hosting a leadership symposium and coordinating college and career fairs, are provided to assure the academic success and retention of dual-enrollment students.  

 

Conclusion: Coastal Bend College is committed to providing appropriate and comprehensive academic support services.

 

3.4.10   The institution places primary responsibility for the content, quality, and effectiveness of the curriculum with its faculty. (Responsibility for curriculum)

_X__  Compliance           ___  Partial Compliance          ___  Non-Compliance

 

Narrative:   The College president and vice-presidents authorize and establish procedures for curriculum development.  Academic policy changes can be initiated by any faculty member who then presents the change to the division chair. Faculty and division chairs will develop and or revise curriculum.  The division chair(s) then present the recommendations to the Vice-President of Instruction and Economic and Workforce Development.  Prior to approval, these changes will be reviewed by the curriculum and catalog committee.  Any changes, if approved, will then be implemented [EE (LOCAL)p. 1].

 

The process of curriculum approval includes contributions from faculty, division chairs, and program directors. Curriculum approval is guided by the ACGM and WECM and the CBC Core Curriculum identifying intellectual competencies and educational objectives. Curriculum is periodically assessed and measured for effectiveness through the assessment of student learning outcomes contained in the Institutional Effectiveness process which measures students’ acquisition of knowledge, retention of knowledge, effective teaching methodologies/strategies, and learning outcomes.

 

Quality of curriculum is ensured through consistent review of instructional materials (textbooks, student resources, etc.) with the most current materials being selected for use in classes. In addition faculty members are required to meet and document a minimum of 12 hours of professional development each year. Many faculty members meet this requirement by attending professional conferences and they incorporate this new information of current trends of their respective disciplines in the curriculum.

 

The quality and effectiveness of the curriculum and learning outcomes are measured by the IE process, program reviews, program accreditation reviews, student evaluations, and peer reviews at department and chair association meetings.  In accordance with EFAA (LEGAL), the core curriculum is reviewed and evaluated every ten years in accordance with the institution’s accreditation reaffirmation self- study report to the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools and reports the results of that evaluation to the Coordinating Board.

 

Currently, the Core Curriculum Committee comprised of division chairs and directed by the Dean of Academics is developing a new general education core curriculum.  This new core will replace the current core curriculum and take effect in the fall of 2014.  This change is mandated by the Texas Higher Education coordinating Board.  This process involves course selection, the mapping of core competencies to foundational component areas, the development of assessment measures, and the use of assessment results.  This entire process is faculty driven.

 

3.4.11. For each major in a degree program, the institution assigns responsibility for program coordination, as well as for curriculum development and review, to persons academically qualified in the field.  In those degree programs for which the institution does not identify a major, this requirement applies to a curricular area or concentration. (Academic program coordination)

__X_  Compliance           ___  Partial Compliance          ___  Non-Compliance

 

Narrative:     Coastal Bend College has qualified coordinators for each major, curricular area, or concentration in an undergraduate or certificate program and has the qualifications and credentials for leadership in the development and review of the program and its curriculum. The credentials vary from individual to individual along with years of experience and time employed by the College. The College directory of division chairs and program directors (CBC catalog, page 160) provides information on the qualifications of these individuals. Faculty vitae’s (EFA LEGAL) (Price) are available on the faculty web pages. This includes faculty members’, educational attainment, teaching experience and professional publications.

Coordinators provide oversight for assessing the quality of the program and its curriculum and for ensuring that the curriculum, as well as the delivery of the curriculum, is educationally sound through annual program reviews, various workforce programs’ accreditation processes, meeting state licensure requirements, and adhering to the ACGM and WECM course descriptions.

Chair and Coordinator qualifications table

CBC awards academic credit for course work taken on a noncredit basis such as continuing education and military courses when there is documentation that the noncredit course work is equivalent to a designated credit experience.

 

Continuing Education

Basic adult education programs shall be provided by the College District in accordance with state statute and the regulations and standards formulated by the State Board of Education, and all Career Technical/Workforce continuing education courses shall meet the guidelines outlined in the Guidelines for Instructional Programs in Workforce Education as approved by the Coordinating Board and WECM as authorized by policy EFCB (LEGAL.

Coastal Bend College awards academic credit for course work taken as continuing education mirror courses with approval.  This was formerly the responsibility of the Dean of Instructional Services; however, due to the new organization of the College administration, this will be the responsibility of the Vice-President of Instruction and Workforce and Economic Development.

 

It is the responsibility of the College to document that coursework is equivalent to collegiate coursework, that all student competencies are met, and that the coursework was taught by a qualified instructor.  When a course can be delivered for semester credit hours and continuing education hours, it is defined as a mirror course and must be offered as published in the WECM.  Coastal Bend College is responsible for meeting the requirements of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges. Courses earning CEUs are subject to the SACS-COC guidelines and must be approved by the established procedures of the Coordinating Board.  These programs shall be provided by the College District in accordance with state statute and the regulations and standards formulated by the State Board of Education (Education Code 29.253).

 

For the transfer of a non-credit status to credit hours being awarded to a student, he/she must have met the course requirements imposed on the students who took the course for credit hours.  The CBC Catalog lists the following guidelines required for a continuing education course to be converted to a credit course:

  • A formal application for conversion must be made to the Vice President of Instruction.
  • The student must pass a competency exam in each specific subject area and must pay a $25 conversion fee for each class.
  • Students must follow regular credit course registration; however, space availability is totally dependent upon the number of credit students enrolled.

Military Training

Coastal Bend College grants credit for service schools completed by military and retired military personnel in accordance with the American Council on Education’s Guide to the Evaluation of Educational Experience in the Armed Services, provided students follow specific guidelines.  Any official military record that describes the training completed, verifies successful completion of such training, and satisfies the purpose of the course for which the student is seeking credit will be considered when determining whether to award course credit toward a degree offered by Coastal Bend College.  The College can award additional course credit (when considered appropriate) for a student’s military service as stated in policy EGA (LEGAL).  The College Catalog lists the guidelines required for those seeking to receive credit for military training:

·         The student is officially enrolled at CBC

·         The student furnishes official documents indicating satisfactory completion of service schools for which credit at CBC is requested

·         CBC has in its curricula equivalent courses for which the guide recommends that credit be given or if a recommended course can reasonably be counted as an elective in a given program.

 

A student received transcripted semester credit hours for military training toward an AAS Degree (RN Program). The Vice-President of Instruction and Economic and Workforce Development has approved the awarding of credit for BIOL 2401 for his previous military training.  The student has an Anatomy and Physiology course (2 SCH) and another Anatomy and Physiology course (4 SCH).  Two (2) Anatomy and Physiology courses (total of 6 SCH) is equivalent to BIOL 2401 (4SCH).

 

3.4.12  The institution’s use of technology enhances student learning and is appropriate for meeting the objectives of its programs.  Students have access to and training in the use of technology. (Technology use)   

__X_  Compliance           ___  Partial Compliance          ___  Non-Compliance

 

Narrative:

The CBC goal is to provide training and technical assistance to all students enrolled at Coastal Bend College. CBC provides students various ways to communicate with technical support staff including email, toll-free phone support, and online chat. Navigation links on the Distance Learning Student Resources page are very student friendly.  Distance Learning provides students with resources on the use of technology to include online tutorials on various topics and free plug-ins.  Technical assistance is provided in written and video formats.  Additional training is provided within Blackboard on the topics of e-tutoring and blackboard mobile.  Students also have access to computer labs and on campus wireless service.   

 

The Distance Learning Department provides training of faculty and staff in the use and operation of distance learning facilities. Through the Distance Learning Faculty Resources web page faculty has access to the use of technology that includes the LMS and Campus Connect. Coastal Bend College has a group of “Blackboard Experts” comprised of 15 faculty members that are available to work with other faculty who want to use this technology to enhance their courses. These experts have developed training modules that have been placed within a course in Blackboard and are available for any CBC faculty who wants to learn more. Distance Learning also provides faculty with a faculty resource page on the distance learning website such as a step by step faculty instructional manual, video tutorials, and quick start guides. Distance Learning also provides online certification courses (vCBC Level I and vCBC Level II) that instructors can take. Upon completion of these online courses, instructors will be certified to teach online classes for Coastal Bend College in their respective discipline. Access to the technology resources is available for instructional and administrative purposes and in accordance with administrative regulations. (CR LOCAL)

 

Support

To support the use of technology at Coastal Bend College, Distance Learning provides students and faculty with a helpdesk available by telephone (toll free – 866-722-2838 ext. 2506 or direct line at 361-354-2506), email (helpdesk@coastalbend.edu or ycharles@coastalbend.edu), or live chat (hours of operation: Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. or Monday through Thursday, 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. during the summer months). In the case where a student or faculty member is unable to reach anyone via the live chat, they will be provided an opportunity to make contact via email with a 24 hour response time Monday through Friday. If email is sent to the helpdesk over the weekend or during a holiday, response time will be made within 24 hours on the next business day.

 

3.5 Educational Programs:  Undergraduate Programs

3.5.1    The institution identifies College-level general education competencies and the extent to which students have attained them. (General education competencies)

__X_  Compliance           __ _  Partial Compliance          ___  Non-Compliance

Narrative:  The core curriculum provides for basic intellectual competencies:

·         Reading

·         Writing

·         Speaking

·         Listening

·         Critical Thinking

·         Computer Literacy

 

Coastal Bend College utilizes the Components of the Core Curriculum following the recommendations of the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board.  The components of the core curriculum include:

·         Communication (composition, speech communication, modern language)

o   The objective of a communication component of a core curriculum is to enable to communicate effectively in clear and correct prose in a style appropriate to the subject, occasion, and audience.

·         Mathematics

o   The objective of the mathematics component of the core curriculum is to develop a quantitatively literate College graduate.  Every College graduate should be able to apply basic mathematical tools in the solution of real world problems.

·         Natural Sciences

o   The objective of the study of a natural sciences component of a core curriculum is to enable the student to understand, construct, and evaluate relationships in the natural sciences, and to enable the student to understand the basis for building and testing theories.

·         Humanities, Visual and Performing Arts

o   The objective of the humanities and visual and performing arts in a core curriculum is to expand students’ knowledge of the human condition and human cultures, especially in relation to behaviors, ideas, and values expressed in words of human imagination and thought.  Through study in disciplines such as literature, philosophy, and the visual and performing arts, students will engage in critical analysis, form aesthetic judgments, and develop an appreciation of the arts and humanities as fundamental to the health and survival of any society.  Students should have experiences in both the arts and humanities.

·         Social and Behavioral Sciences

o   The objective of a social and behavioral science component of a core curriculum is to increase student’s knowledge of how social and behavioral sciences discover, describe, and explain the behaviors and interactions among individual, groups, institutions, events, and ideas.  Such knowledge will better equip students to understand themselves and the roles they play in addressing the issues facing humanity

·         Institutional Designated Option (Kinesiology and Computer Literacy)

o   The objective of a kinesiology component of a core curriculum is to increase student’s knowledge of how health and wellness can contribute to one’s well-being.

o   The objective of a computer literacy component of a core curriculum is to increase students’ knowledge of how computers impact their life and work.

 

The core curriculum was designed for transfer degrees AA, AS, and AAT that was prescribed by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board beginning with the 1996-1997 College Catalog.  The AAS also includes some of the core competencies expected of a graduating student.  The Academic Course Guide Manual (ACGM) describes the competencies and courses involved.

 

The College began collecting the core competencies as student learning outcomes in the 2010-2011 year.  The initial collection of data included student outcomes in writing and critical thinking.  This information was collected for writing by examining a sample of essays from English Composition classes.  The English Department faculty created a rubric and reviewed a random sample of writings.  The results were documented.  The Science Department evaluated an essay on the analysis of scientific theory.  This random sample was reviewed by the department chair to provide results to see if students progressing through a typical Biology 1408 class could provide an analysis and synthesize information.  The math department chair collected information on the final exam from MATH 1314 to determine if students were able to apply arithmetic, algebraic, and higher level thinking.  Students’ work was examined in Kinesiology classes to determine if students demonstrated knowledge of how health and wellness can contribute to one’s well-being. 

 

Coastal Bend College continues to utilize and measure learning outcomes for the core curriculum areas.  TaskStream software system is utilized to document the student learning results on an annual basis.  The faculty has continued to measure outcomes and add new learning outcomes to more accurately define outcomes and document results. The College continues to measure core competencies of students passing through course work that measures general education outcomes, not segregating if a student is seeking AA, AS, AAT, or AAS.  The reason for this is to provide student learning outcomes results of any student passing through the College registered in any degree program.

 

The Nichols 5-column model began with determining the learning outcome, the direct measure of learning outcome, establishment of targets in order to determine success, the assessment results of the direct measure, and then provided opportunity for the program to determine plans for improving student learning.  This Excel document and system was then replaced by TaskStream beginning in 2010-2011.  The advantage of utilizing the software solution provides the opportunity to review prior years of student learning outcomes assessment any time an instructor has access to the internet when planning for continued teaching and learning improvement.

 

3.5.2    At least 25 percent of the credit hours required for the degree are earned through instruction offered by the institution awarding the degree. (See the Commission policy “Collaborative Academic Arrangements.”) (Institutional credits for a degree).

_X__  Compliance           ___  Partial Compliance          ___  Non-Compliance

 

Narrative:   For an Associate Degree, a minimum of 16 semester credit hours of course work prior to graduation must be earned at CBC; for a Certificate of Achievement, 15 semester hours of course work prior to graduation must be earned at CBC.  (Catalog, page 73)

The transcript evaluation is provided in the Instructional Services Office.  The approved transfer courses are entered into the student transcript as “transfer credit.”  Graduation applications are submitted to the College Registrar for verification of graduation requirements and approval by the College Registrar.

 

3.5.3    The institution publishes requirements for its undergraduate programs, including its general education components. These requirements conform to commonly accepted standards and practices for degree programs. (See the Commission policy “The Quality and Integrity of Undergraduate Degrees.”) (Undergraduate program requirements)

__X_  Compliance           ___  Partial Compliance          ___  Non-Compliance

 

Narrative:   The institution publishes requirements for its undergraduate programs, including its general education components.  These requirements conform to commonly accepted standards and practices for degree programs.

 

Coastal Bend College publishes requirements for each program in the College Catalog (pg. 76-120).  Each program adheres to the criteria established by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board. The catalog is available to all prospective and currently enrolled students.  Both print version and online catalogs are available for review.

 

The College offers the AA, AS, AAT for transfer students.  In addition, the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board prescribes Field of Study Curriculum in Business (AA or AS), Field of Study Curriculum in Computer Science (AS), Field of Study Curriculum in Criminal Justice (AA or AS), Field of Study Curriculum in Music (AS), Field of Study Curriculum in Teaching (AAT).  In compliance with the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board rules, students in the programs offering these degrees are required to complete at maximum of 66 semester credit hours.  The College also offers the AAS degree for students.  The mandate from the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board provides for all curriculums to be completed in 60-72 semester credit hours. 

 

The AA and AS are comprised of 45 semester credit hours from the core curriculum and 15 hours of courses in the major, minor, or electives.  The AAT is comprised of 45 semester credit hours from the core curriculum and 18 semester credit hours in Education related courses, math, and science.  The Field of Study Curriculum in Business includes 51 semester credit hours from the core and 14 semester credit hours in Business related classes.  The Field of Study Curriculum in Computer Science includes 51 semester credit hours from the core and 15-16 semester credit hours from computer science courses.  The Field of Study Curriculum in Criminal Justice includes 45 semester credit hours from the core and 21 semester credit hours from Criminal Justice courses.  The Field of Study Curriculum in Music includes 31 semester credit hours in the core and 35 semester credit hours in Music courses.  Please note, according to prescribed Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board rules, students must complete 31 hours of the general education core curriculum at Coastal Bend College.  They may complete the remainder of the general education core curriculum in effect at the institution that will grant the baccalaureate degree.   For the AAS, curriculums designate the general education courses required; the AAS minimum is 9 semester credit hours from the core curriculum/general education core. 

All courses comply with Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board requirements.  The Division Chair Association acts as the curriculum review body at the College.  The Division Chair Association reviews proposed changes and approves those changes as necessary and deemed appropriate.

 

3.5.4    At least 25 percent of the course hours in each major at the baccalaureate level are taught by faculty members holding an appropriate terminal degree—usually the earned doctorate or the equivalent of the terminal degree. (Terminal degrees of faculty)

___  Compliance           ___  Partial Compliance          ___  Non-Compliance

Narrative:  NOT APPLICABLE TO Coastal Bend College.

 

3.7  Faculty

3.7.1    The institution employs competent faculty members qualified to accomplish the mission and goals of the institution.  When determining acceptable qualifications of its faculty, an institution gives primary consideration to the highest earned degree in the discipline.  The institution also considers competence, effectiveness, and capacity, including, as appropriate, undergraduate and graduate degrees, related work experiences in the field, professional licensure and certifications, honors and awards, continuous documented excellence in teaching, or other demonstrated competencies and achievements that contribute to effective teaching and student learning outcomes. For all cases, the institution is responsible for justifying and documenting the qualifications of its faculty. (See the Commission guidelines “Faculty Credentials.”) (Faculty competence)    

__X_  Compliance           ___  Partial Compliance          ___  Non-Compliance

 

Narrative:   Coastal Bend College hires and retains highly qualified full-time and adjunct faculty to teach transfer, non-transfer, and developmental courses that support certificate and associate’s degree programs and the Mission of the College.

 

Determining Acceptable Faculty Qualifications

All faculty credentials (including official transcripts, licensures, and/or verified experience) for both full-time and adjunct staff are housed in the Human Resources Office.   In addition to the above stated credentials, all files contain the following additional information - An Employee Credential Form, and a completed Faculty Competency Compliance Checklist Credential Sheet.   This worksheet is a summary of the instructor’s credentials/qualifications and what type of courses the instructor is qualified to teach based on their credentials.  In addition, other documentation, if required, may be maintained in the employees’ personnel file.

 

The guidelines and standards utilized by Coastal Bend College’s instructors are the same as those approved by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools - Commission on Colleges and are listed below.  They include:

  • To teach transfer courses, a faculty member must hold either a master’s degree in the teaching discipline or a master’s degree with at least 18 documented graduate credit hours in the teaching disciple,
  • To teach non-transfer workforce and technical courses, a faculty member must hold a bachelor’s degree in the discipline or a minimum of an associate’s degree in the teaching discipline and three years of verifiable work experience in the field.  In addition, competencies may include licensure, various certifications, honors and/or awards, and/or continuing education,
  • To teach developmental courses, a faculty member must hold a bachelor’s degree in a related discipline, teaching experience and/or certification(s) and/or  graduate credit hours in the field,
  • To teach marketable skills workforce courses, GIPWIE is used as the authoritarian’s source for credentials,
  • To teach distance learning courses, instructors are required to go through a series of training sessions (http://www.coastalbend.edu/DL/ ).  Courses, training, and information are offered through the Learning Management Systems Coordinator.

In addition, the College utilizes an exception process to make decisions in instances in which an instructor being considered to teach a course or courses not designed for transfer to the baccalaureate degree does not possess the established minimum credentials:

The Compliance Review Board voted unanimously on August 23, 2012 to recognize the GIPWE as the authoritarians’ source for all faculty credentials in the workforce area.  This was based on the discovery that the Faculty Qualifications Table that had been in place since 2008 did not address the faculty qualifications needed to teach marketable skills certificates.  The President approved this proposal on August 23, 2012:

All full-time faculty members are hired through a search and screening process.  Before this process is initiated, the following steps must be followed:

  1. A personnel requisition must be completed which justifies need, education, and experience required which is signed off by the department chair and appropriate administrator, affirmative action officer, and President.
  2. A search committee is appointed whose composition includes the department chair and a diverse representation of individuals who have job content knowledge and/or institution knowledge from the discipline of the position being advertised.  All individuals who comprise membership on a search committee are also required to receive and maintain interview training.  This online training must be taken annually to ensure that faculty understands how critical the nature of the interviewing process is to the College and/or their department.  The training is comprised of information relating to the hiring and/or interviewing process.  The Human Resources Office provides information on the interviewing/search committee process:  Applicants go through a two tier interview process which includes a criminal background check, as required by policy DC (Local) and a teaching demonstration in the initial tier.  Recommendations for 2nd tier interviews are made through the 1st tier committee to the President.  The President approves all recommendations for hire.

 

Adjuncts are interviewed by the chair of the department after a personnel requisition has been completed and approved by the President, application materials have been received and copies of all transcripts/licensures, employment verifications are received and verified. All instructors’ credentials are on a faculty matrix on the instructional webpage. The College’s affirmative action statements are stated in the following policies: DAA (Legal) and DC (Local). In addition, in order to ensure that faculty maintains the integrity of the programs they are instructing, and the highest utmost credentials, Coastal Bend College requires that all employees complete twelve (12) hours of professional development each year, according to policy DK (LOCAL). Twelve hours of professional development is also part of the contract that faculty members sign. The Human Resources Office maintains a link on their website with information on professional development.

3.7.2    The institution regularly evaluates the effectiveness of each faculty member in accord with published criteria, regardless of contractual or tenured status. (Faculty evaluation)

__X_  Compliance           ___  Partial Compliance          ___  Non-Compliance

 

Narrative:   Coastal Bend College evaluates all faculty, both full-time and part-time on an annual basis, according to Policy DLA (Local).

In addition, student evaluations on faculty employees are conducted every year according to policy DLA (LEGAL). To assist with evaluations, the Human Resources department provides on its website tools which include

1.   Archived evaluation training instructions,

·         for new chairs and/or coordinators,

·         to remind all supervisors conducting evaluations how critical this aspect is to the employee and/or the College,

2.   Evaluation forms,

3.   E-mail reminders to supervisory staff (chairs/coordinators) beginning in January of upcoming evaluation timeframes.

4.   Student evaluations are performed in November and are received in January by chairs. 

 

The evaluation process consists of several components:  the faculty self- evaluation, the faculty evaluation by the chair and recommendation for renewal or non-renewal, and the student evaluations of the faculty member conducted in November.  Chairs schedule instruction observations each year to enable them to properly evaluate the individual faculty member’s instruction.  They utilize evaluation forms which have been approved by their association and the President previously.  The forms used are the chair evaluation form and the faculty self-evaluation form.

The facets of the evaluation process include:

·       individual classroom observation by the chair,

·       the faculty self-evaluation,

·       the chair written evaluation, and

·       the student evaluations

The evaluation allows the faculty member to recognize and appreciate their strengths, evaluate their progress towards previously established goals, identify and/or establish new goals, and discuss areas (if any) that might need improvement.  Recommendations for renewal or non-renewal are made by the chair(s) at this time. The Dean of Academics and the Dean of Workforce and Economic Development then review their respective faculty evaluations and other evidence of the faculty member’s work and effort and will make written recommendations for either renewal, renewal with improvement (Performance Improvement Plan), and/or dismissal to the President. 

 

Through these established and published policies and procedures by Coastal Bend College’s Board, the President is able to make a decision and commitment to our students and faculty members for the upcoming year.  This annual evaluation of faculty member performance allows the College to continuously enhance the effectiveness of its faculty member’s performance.    The goal of this performance assessment is to ensure that our faculty members keep “Student Success in Sight”, its first goal of Vision 2020:  (Coastal Bend College will offer a quality educational experience for all students.) by measuring the quality of teaching to ensure continuous improvement.

 

3.7.3    The institution provides ongoing professional development of faculty as teachers, scholars, and practitioners. (Faculty development)

_X__  Compliance           ___  Partial Compliance          ___  Non-Compliance

 

Narrative:   Coastal Bend College reiterates this message continuously:

  1. As Part of its Mission supported by policy:

            Coastal Bend College is a comprehensive, public community College serving a diverse South Texas area.  It is a student-centered institution committed to the highest integrity and to the development of an educational culture that supports creativity, encourages professional development, and promotes excellence in all areas.  Policy AD (Local) 

 

  1. Through Policy DK(Local):

o   Instructional personnel are expected to make continuous professional progress while on the faculty of the College District.  Supervisory personnel are expected to review annually with each division member the nature and progress of his professional development.  Instructors are expected to realize professional progress through such activities as the following:

o   Completion of additional College work.

o   Participating in professional organizations and meetings, seminars, workshops, special study groups, independent study groups, independent study or research, travel, work experience, private instruction, publishing, and leadership in civic organizations.

o   Professional growth shall be considered a factor in the evaluation of teaching personnel.

  1. As part of its strategic plan, Vision 2020 Goal Four which is:

“Coastal Bend College will effectively and efficiently use resources to benefit our students.”

 

Objective One of this goal is: “to attract and retain quality personnel by providing professional development opportunities for employees. “This is critical for the College believes that instruction can improve only if its faculty members continue to develop their professional skills. 

The Human Resources Office just recently was placed in charge of assisting faculty and staff with professional development opportunities.  Opportunities are sent to staff through email and are on the HR website.

 

These will include online opportunities, face-to-face opportunities, conference travel, and association memberships to support their professional growth.  CBC faculty are able to attend discipline centered conferences allowing them to network with faculty working in their discipline at other higher education sites and heighten their awareness and knowledge of their respective fields.  For example, our nursing instructors have attended TAVNE (Texas Association of Vocational Nursing Educators) conferences, our child development educators have attended NAEYC (National Association for the Education of Young Children) conferences, and our math instructors have attended ME by the Sea (Math Educators and Science Educators) conferences.   Many also have taken additional training and/or webinars in Blackboard, AVID, and Ektron courses to increase their knowledge of web-based instruction as this type of instruction is increasing exponentially as well as attending Title V Distance Learning conferences.  Coastal Bend College understands that the professional development opportunities offered to our faculty has a direct, positive relationship to the success of our students.

 

3.7.4    The institution ensures adequate procedures for safeguarding and protecting academic freedom. (Academic freedom)

__X_  Compliance           ___  Partial Compliance          ___  Non-Compliance

 

Narrative:   Coastal Bend College clarifies the importance of academic freedom as part of its role, mission, purpose, and responsibility statement in policy AD (Local):

The College states in this policy in its “Statement of Ethics and Integrity”  ”We shall by example and action encourage and defend the unhindered pursuit of truth by teachers, administrators, non-academic personnel, any other higher education employees, and students supporting the free exchange of ideas, observing the highest standards of academic honesty, integrity, scholarship, and tolerance of other viewpoints.”  In addition….”We shall support the right of all to academic freedom and due process.”

This concept is expounded upon further in policy: DGC (Local) and DH (Exhibit).

 

DGC (Local) states that “Each faculty is entitled to academic freedom within the established guidelines of the Faculty Code of Professional Ethics in the classroom in discussing the subject which he or she teaches.  Each faculty member is a citizen of his or her nation, state, and community, and when he or she is speaking or writing as a citizen, shall be free from instructional censorship or discipline by the College District. The Faculty Code of Ethics, policy DH (Exhibit) states clearly the reasons academic freedom is so critical to instructors and the purpose of academic freedom:  “Learning best occurs in an environment devoted to the pursuit of truth, excellence, and liberty.  These flourish where both freedom and responsibility are esteemed.  The Professional Educator shall by example and action encourage and defend the unfettered pursuit of truth by both colleagues and students supporting the free exchange of ideas, observing the highest standards of academic honesty, and integrity, and seeking always an attitude of scholarly objectivity and tolerance of other viewpoints.  The Professional Educator shall support the right of all colleagues to academic freedom and due process and defend and assist a professional colleague accused of wrongdoing, incompetence, or other serious offense so long as the colleague’s  innocence  may be reasonably be maintained. 

 

In addition, students at Coastal Bend College are encouraged to exercise their personal freedom to explore and learn to their fullest potential:  “They do not shed their constitutional right to freedom of speech or expression at the schoolhouse gate.  ….students have First Amendment rights….” This is expressed in both the Student Handbook and the Coastal Bend College Catalog 2012-2013 on page 48:

Grievance Procedures are explained in the policy manual in DGBA (Local).

 

3.7.5      The institution publishes policies on the responsibility and authority of faculty in academic and governance matters. (Faculty role in governance)

__X_  Compliance           ___  Partial Compliance          ___  Non-Compliance

Narrative:   The ultimate responsibility and authority rests with the College’s district Board of Trustees.  The Board policy, BAA (LEGAL:

The Board, being composed of lay members, shall exercise the traditional and time-honored role as it has evolved in the United States and shall constitute the keystone of the governance structure.  In this regard, the Board:

1.        Is expected to preserve institutional independence and to defend its right to manage its own affairs through its chosen administrators and employees.

2.        Shall enhance the public image of the College District under its governance.

3.        Shall interpret the community to the campus and interpret the campus to the community.

4.        Shall nurture the College District under its governance to the end that it achieves its full potential within its role and mission.

5.        Shall insist on clarity of focus and mission of the College District under its governance.

 

As a body of lay members, the Board must rely heavily on its faculty, staff, and administrators in order to fulfill the responsibilities with which it is charged.  The areas of curriculum development (EE LOCAL), curriculum design (EFA LEGAL and EFB LEGAL), and instructional programs for academic courses (EFAA LEGAL), and technical/vocational courses (EFAB LEGAL) require involvement of program faculty, division chairs, and respective Advisory Committees for community and workforce needs.

 

Faculty is charged with collegial responsibilities which include areas of governance.  Academic freedom (DGC LOCAL) is essential to the open exchange of ideas, philosophies, and theories between professor and students, fostering critical thinking and intelligent decision making.  The professional code of ethics (DH EXHIBIT) is the foundation by which all educators within the institution achieve the College mission.  The preamble of the Faculty Code of Professional Ethics states:

Professional Educators affirm the inherent worth and dignity of all persons and the right of all persons to learn. Learning best occurs in an environment devoted to the pursuit of truth, excellence, and liberty. These flourish where both freedom and responsibility are esteemed.

 

Committee Assignments and Faculty Senate

Assessment of institutional effectiveness and implementation of changes for continuous improvement demand the full participation of faculty.  Committee assignments (DI LOCAL) by the president and recommendations of the Faculty Senate are governance mechanisms that sustain this process.  The excerpt from the Faculty Senate Bylaws  expresses the commitment of the faculty to governance issues:

 

·         Present the views and recommendations of the electorate to the administration and to the Board of Trustees of Coastal Bend College as they relate to the policies of academic and professional matters.

 

·         Be an integral and active part of the instructional programs, policy making and growth plans of Coastal Bend College.

 

·         Foster programs and activities that shall develop the pride, responsibility, leadership, character, and community involvement of the members.

 

·         Develop cooperation and fellowship among the faculty, staff, and administration of Coastal Bend College.

 

·         Develop cooperation between the instructional programs, and between the instructional and support programs of Coastal Bend College.

 

Faculty Senate Committees dealing directly with governance contained within the Bylaws are:

·         Academic Freedom and Responsibility Committee - [five members, 2academic faculty, 2 workforce faculty and 1 at large representing at least three campuses.]

·         The Committee on Academic Freedom and Responsibility shall continually review the policies of Coastal Bend College concerning academic freedom and responsibility including faculty development and make appropriate recommendations to the Senate.

 

·         Evaluation of Instruction Committee [seven members, 2 academic faculty, 2 workforce faculty and 3 at large representing at least three campuses.]

·         The Evaluation of Instruction Committee shall continually study instruction at Coastal Bend College and shall suggest means of evaluating instructional effectiveness. The purpose of the evaluation shall be the self-improvement of the faculty members.

·         The committee shall work with the office of Institutional Effectiveness to ensure the methods and procedures are in compliance with Southern Association of College and Texas Coordinating Board requirements.

·         The committee will be responsible for preparing guidelines as to how evaluations may be distributed and used.

 

Division Chair Association

The Division Chair Association, composed of all Coastal Bend College division chairs, is the Curriculum and Catalog Committee.  The committee evaluates proposed program curriculum changes and makes recommendations to the Dean of Instructional Services.  The curriculum-change process is described in Standard 3.4.1. 

 

Governance within this association is explained by the following excerpt from its by-laws: